Workshop ‘Canadian Leadership on Nuclear Disarmament’ October 2018

Workshop presented by Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW) and Canadians for a Nuclear Weapons Convention (CNWC)

Rapporteur’s Report

Jessica West, Project Ploughshares: October 2018

Overview

The workshop “Canadian Leadership for Nuclear Disarmament” jointly hosted by the Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW) and Canadians for a Nuclear Weapons Convention (CNWC) brought together civil society and academic experts with Canadian government representatives to dissect the current nuclear weapons context and identify opportunities for civil society engagement and Canadian government leadership on disarmament and non-proliferation.

Key points from the discussion emphasize the coalescence of crisis and opportunity:

  • We face a global nuclear crisis that threatens to undo years of progress on non-proliferation and disarmament and risks nuclear escalation and confrontation;
  • NATO’s nuclear posture is an affront to disarmament and contributes to this crisis;
  • Current Government of Canada positions on NATO and the Treaty on the Prevention of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) are complicit in this crisis;
  • Canada has previously played a positive role in advancing peace and disarmament internationally;
  • Canada’s emphasis on a feminist foreign policy and desire for greater international prominence including a seat at the UN Security Council provide an opportunity to encourage renewed leadership;
  • There is a desire from both civil society and Parliamentarians for Canada to resume a leadership position on nuclear disarmament, not least within NATO;
  • Better relations with Russia are critical for progress on both non-proliferation and disarmament;
  • Practical options are available to initiate change in NATO’s nuclear posture and reduce tensions with Russia;
  • Civil society is critical for both maintaining pressure on governments and as a source of guidance and knowledge;
  • To raise the public profile of nuclear abolition, current civil society efforts must reach more broadly to engage new movements and issues with which we share common interests in peace, survival, and an alternative future.

The current moment is urgent. The new nuclear arms race, involving “modernization” in all arsenals and new nuclear use doctrines, risk a nuclear confrontation as well as long-term damage to disarmament efforts. At the same time, shifting international power structures create new opportunities for leadership toward a world without nuclear weapons.

Part I: A Nuclear Inflection Point

The keynote address by Joe Cirincioni – President of the Ploughshares Fund in the United States – titled “Nuclear Insecurity in the Age of Trump and Putin” outlined the current crisis that defines the contemporary strategic context in which nuclear weapons are situated.

The parameters of this crisis are threefold:

  • Danger on the Korean peninsula
  • Growing confrontation between the United States and Iran
  • Renewed nuclear arms race among nuclear weapons states

While the security situation on the Korean peninsula has shifted toward unprecedented diplomacy and seems to be giving way to a new security dynamic, Cirincioni stressed that it is not clear if this progress will continue in the absence of robust political encouragement and support. In contrast, the relationship between Iran and the United States continues to deteriorate. The US Administration’s withdrawal from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) to inspect Iranian nuclear facilities and prevent its pursuit of nuclear weapons includes sanctions on firms and allies who engage in legal business practices with the regime. Moreover, the demands being made of Iran are described as an unconditional surrender. Not only are diplomatic paths to peace being closed, but there is a strong potential for direct confrontation through mutual presence and competing interests on the ground in Syria, which could unintentionally escalate.

The ability to contain these two non-proliferation crises is compromised by a crisis of disarmament among nuclear weapons states. Nuclear capabilities and delivery systems are being modernized and military doctrines revised in such a way that their use is slipping from an unthinkable, strategic deterrent to a useable, tactical weapon of limited warfare. This is dangerous. Not only does it risk catastrophic escalation, but the basic compromise that facilitated non-proliferation – the promise of disarmament – faces a death knell. The steady path of nuclear reductions over the past three decades has halted and been replaced with re-armament. Cirincioni describes this as an inflection point: once it gets going, it will be very difficult to turn back.

This sentiment is echoed by Ambassador Paul Meyer from The Simons Foundation, who equated the contemporary arms race between the world’s nuclear superpowers to the strategic standoff of the 1970s and ’80s. Emphasizing previous Canadian leadership under Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, Meyer described his “strategy of suffocation,” which proposed to cut off the oxygen feeding nuclear armament by banning warhead testing, ending test flights of warhead delivery vehicles, prohibiting further fissile materials production, and cutting spending on nuclear weapons. The earlier Prime Minister Trudeau was willing to expend political capital to challenge dominant security dynamics in pursuit of peace through reasoned policy alternatives.

Calling on Canada to move from “inertia to initiative,” Meyer offered the following recommendations:

  • Voice concern that a new nuclear arms race is emerging and that it brings unacceptable risks for the international community;
  • Reject the excuse that arms control and disarmament cannot progress because we have a difficult international environment with which to contend;
  • Call for a prompt return to a US-Russia strategic dialogue and preservation of existing arms control and disarmament agreements;
  • Acknowledge that the NPT is under threat, including from wide-spread weapons modernization programs, and recognize that the multilateral disarmament foreseen by this treaty requires concrete expression;
  • Pursue leadership on a Fissile Materials Cut-off Treaty (FMCT) by seeking to obtain UN General Assembly authorization for a multilateral negotiation of such a treaty;
  • Resist efforts to extend earthly conflict into outer space by once again advocating the nonweaponisation of this domain;
  • Embrace a recommitment to multilateral disarmament diplomacy and re-invest in the resources required to support this.

Discussion emphasized opportunities and constraints for non-US leadership on nuclear disarmament, particularly by allies within NATO. Noting current tensions within the Alliance and ebbing American leadership, there is a sensed opportunity for members to break with the Alliance on nuclear issues, particularly if encouraged to do so. Similarly, the current crisis in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) process presents an opportunity for other countries to step forward and lead on this issue. The success of the Nuclear Ban Treaty speaks to this opening. Canada’s bid for a UN Security Council seat is noted as a chance to exert influence.

Part II: NATO’S “supreme guarantee”

Focused on the role of NATO in the elimination of nuclear weapons, the second panel sought to elucidate the constraints that it imposes on disarmament and its role in the current nuclear crisis while identifying opportunities for Canada to advance disarmament from within the Alliance. All speakers emphasized the critical need for re-engagement with Russia.

Ernie Regehr, with The Simons Foundation and the Centre for Peace Advancement, pointed out that NATO does not itself have nuclear weapons and that NATO’s status as a nuclear weapons alliance is based on the willingness of individual Alliance members with nuclear weapons (or those with US nuclear weapons on their soil by virtue of nuclear sharing) to make their capabilities available for collective operations. In this context NATO’s Strategic Concept communicates the circumstances under which use of nuclear weapons might be considered. The Brussels Summit Declaration issued after the meeting of the North Atlantic Council 11-12 July 2018 included a fulsome defence of nuclear weapons as the “supreme guarantee of the security of allies.” Further, there is growing allusion to the potential for nuclear weapons use in a variety of situations including in response to conventional attack and in a preemptive first strike, which must be understood in the context of weapons modernization programs and entrenching nuclear sharing within Europe

The idea that nuclear weapons of unlimited destructive capacity could be the foundation of security is, quite simply, offensive, particularly as the Alliance also continues to claim that it seeks to create the conditions for a world without nuclear weapons.

Regehr offered the following recommendations to move once again toward détente with Russia as a means of reducing the role of nuclear weapons in national and alliance defence policies:

  • Adopt realistic language to limit the roleof nuclear weapons and highlight the commitment to a world without nuclear weapons, replacing language that characterizes weapons of massive destructive capacity as a supreme guarantee of security;
  • Commit to no first use of nuclear weapons;
  • Repatriate all B61 bombs to the US;
  • Refrain from acquiring dual capable aircraft by non-nuclear weapons states;
  • Pursue missile defence cooperation with Russia;
  • Reinvest in NATO-Russia dialogue and diplomatic engagement

Peggy Mason, President of the Rideau Institute and former Ambassador for Disarmament, presented the recommendations of the all-party, unanimous report submitted by the House of Commons Standing Committee on National Defence in June 2018 regarding Canada and NATO. Recommendation 21 included a welcome call for the government to “…take a leadership role within NATO in beginning the work necessary for achieving the NATO goal of creating the conditions for a world free of nuclear weapons.” Emphasizing the urgency of this issue, the report called attention to several of the points raised by disarmament experts including the renewed risk of nuclear proliferation, potential deployment of tactical nuclear weapons, and changes in nuclear doctrines to lower the threshold of use. The report is a welcome sign of political consensus, and a testament to the influence of civil society, on a specific policy option that could contribute to gradual nuclear disarmament.

Ms. Mason further underscored key themes emerging from the day’s discussion, such as global dissatisfaction with stagnant disarmament trends, and the contrast between previous Canadian leadership and contemporary inaction, including boycotting of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW).

Tom Sauer from the University of Antwerp in Belgium addressed the divergence of European civil society perspectives from the actions of NATO member states with regards to the TPNW. On the one hand, opinion polls show that most Europeans are against the presence of nuclear weapons in Europe and favour signing the Treaty. However, the issue is not adequately discussed or debated at a public level. Secrecy and lack of transparency on behalf of NATO make it difficult for both journalists and activists to engage the issue, and this limits the impact of peace movements.

Within NATO, it is clear that members are reluctant to lead efforts to change the Alliance’s nuclear posture, or to deviate from one another in other disarmament fora.

And yet leadership and change are possible. For example, the Netherlands is the only NATO member to have participated in the TPNW process, which itself was not anticipated just a few years ago. And while the Treaty may not eliminate nuclear weapons quickly, it is essential for stigmatizing their use – particularly in the current crisis – and stimulating new debate within civil society.

Discussion re-iterated the need for engagement on nuclear disarmament, diplomatically within NATO and with Russia, as well as by civil society and journalists. The Artic was raised as an example of how a security community can be created around shared interests.

Part III: Political Disengagement

Limited participation on the parliamentary panel “Canadian Leadership on Nuclear Disarmament” illustrated the current political climate of disengagement with nuclear disarmament. All major Canadian political parties were invited to present their positions. The NDP’s Agricultural Critic, the Hon. Alistair MacGregor, (substituting for the Party Foreign Policy spokesperson who was travelling) was the only person to participate directly. Noting that his party has long opposed nuclear weapons, he asserted that it was a strong proponent of Recommendation 21 within the Standing Committee’s report. MacGregor further questioned how Canada can be “back” while simultaneously failing to participate in the most important disarmament negotiations in years, and pointed to a shift in stance by the Liberal party from its time in opposition.

The Hon. Doug Roche read a statement provided by the current Government of Canada in response to a petition filed on behalf of constituents regarding the TPNW. It emphasized the government’s actions to advance disarmament and its commitment to a pragmatic pursuit of a world without nuclear weapons that takes into account the current security environment. In this environment, the government does not believe that the Treaty will be effective in achieving nuclear disarmament and does not intend to sign the treaty. Instead, its diplomatic efforts are to focus on inclusive measures that unite nuclear and non-nuclear armed states in common goals, specifically the pursuit of a Fissile Materials Cut-off Treaty (FMCT).

A statement submitted by Elizabeth May, leader of the Green Party of Canada, congratulated Setsuko Thurlow on her Nobel recognition for her contributions to the TPNW and the work of the CNANW, referring to the current situation as an “apocalyptic age.”

Discussion reiterated the importance of civil society expertise and advocacy, which Parliamentarians rely on for research and guidance. It was also noted that civil society should urge Parliamentarians to join the Parliamentarians for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Network (PNND).

Part IV: The Way Forward

Mr. Cirincione addressed the final session on “Next Steps for Nuclear Abolition,” outlining the approach of the Ploughshares Fund to, first prevent the worst from happening, and then to build the world that we would like to see. This approach involves engaging politicians now to help them develop policies prior to future elections, finding ways to support positive goals set by the current Administration – including peace with North Korea – and supporting the next generation of civil society leadership on non-proliferation and disarmament. Calling ICAN “a flare that goes up in the night,” he cautioned that the current disarmament effort will not be able to rely on a mass anti-nuclear movement for change, but instead must build ties between nuclear disarmament and other mass movements of today. For example, cross-cutting feminist and environmental movements likewise question existing power dynamics and strive for an alternative future.

The remainder of the session was used to reflect on the learnings of the day and to share ideas for future work.

Returning to Recommendation 21 of the report by the Standing Committee on National Defence regarding NATO and the elimination of nuclear weapons, several speakers emphasized writing to the government prior to the release of its official response, both to express support and to raise questions about how disarmament processes might be raised within various bodies of the Alliance. It was noted that this might be a fruitful avenue for Canadian leadership in the context of its bid for a seat at the UN Security Council.

Conversation also explored options for engaging Nuclear Weapons States (NWS) in steps toward disarmament. It was noted that the UN General Assembly (UNGA) Resolution on fissile materials negotiation in 2016 was supported by 159 states, including three yes votes from NWS and two abstentions. In this context, the Government of Canada continues to prioritize efforts to bring NWS around the table and to create space for dialogue on the issue of a FMCT. Others urged the UNGA First Committee meetings and the NPT Review Conference as opportunities for leadership. The importance of continued Canadian support for the JCPOA was emphasized.

From a civil society perspective, the re-institution of the annual civil society consultation on arms control and disarmament by Global Affairs Canada is viewed as a positive step. The opportunity for additional civil society engagement with the government through its feminist foreign policy and the newly created position of Ambassador for Women, Peace, and Security was noted with cautious optimism, so that the core value of peace within feminism is emphasized. Work to this effect is currently being done by the Canadian Women, Peace and Security Network.

Overall, there is a recognition of a David v. Goliath moment. Disarmament advocates are outgunned (no pun intended) and underfunded. Within civil society, we need to raise funds and raise our voices, build new relationships, and foster creativity in our efforts to advance a world free of nuclear weapons. The need is urgent.

PDF download

The above report is also available as PDF (6 pp): “Canadian Leadership on Nuclear Disarmament” Seminar

CNANW home page

What We Do

The Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW) was established in 1996 by representatives of national organizations that share the conviction that nuclear weapons are immoral and should be abolished. We believe that Canada should lead in working for their early abolition. CNANW’s nineteen member organizations include faith communities, professional groups, peace and women’s organizations — all of whom work in various ways for nuclear abolition.  Read more …


CNANW Conference Participants September 25, 2017, Ottawa

Recent articles and correspondence

  • Letter to P.M. Justin Trudeau, Nov 9, 2018: Making Nuclear Crisis De-escalation and Persistent and Intensified Disarmament Diplomacy a National Priority  [Letter en/fr | pdf]  [Media Release en/fr | pdf]
  • Hon. Douglas Roche: The Moral, Spiritual, Legal, Practical Response to Humanity’s Greatest Threat: Nuclear Weapons, Address at Parliament of the World’s Religions, Nov 5, 2018 [docx]
  • Letter to Prime Minister on Canadian Leadership, 11 Sep 2018: [en/fr | pdf]
  • CNWC Letter to Minister Freeland regarding INF Treaty, endorsed by CNANW [fr | html]  [en | html]
  • “Canadian Leadership on Nuclear Disarmament” workshop: rapporteur’s report
  • Statement by nine Canadian NGOs regarding July NATO Summit, May 2018 [pdf]
  • Roche: Canadian Action for Nuclear Disarmament, May 30 2018 [docx]
  • CNANW Letter to Minister Freeland re 2018 NPT PrepCom: [en | docx] [fr | docx]
  • CNANW September 2017 Conference — Energizing Action By Canada
  • CALL to SIGN Treaty on Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons: [html]
  • Divesting from Companies Producing Nuclear Weapons: Resources Page

CNANW Member Groups

Emeritus Member:

  • Veterans Against Nuclear Arms (VANA): There is a VANA Memorial posted on the Toronto Hiroshima/Nagasaki Day website that gives an extensive history and video and archival links explaining the founding, aims and work of the organization

Endorsers:

Call to sign Prohibition Treaty

ORGANIZATIONS that have signed The CNANW CALL to sign the Nuclear Weapons Prohibition Treaty
(updated March 21, 2018)

The African Community Association of Calgary
The Anglican Church of Canada
Les Artistes pour la Paix
Atomic Photographer’s Guild
Brandon/Westman Chapter, Council of Canadians
Canada Peace Alliance/L’Alliance canadienne pour la paix
Canadian Association for Physicians for the Environment
Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility
Canadian Environmental Law Association
Canadian Federation of University Women
Canadian Friends Service Committee
Canadian Peace Initiative 
Canadian Pugwash Group
Canadian Unitarian Council
Canadian Unitarians for Social Justice
Canadian Voice of Women for Peace
Canadians for a Nuclear Weapons Convention
Chilliwack, BC, Council of Canadians
Citizens in Action Montreal
Climate Justice Saskatoon
Committee for Future Generations
Comox Valley Council of Canadians
Concerned Citizens of Renfrew County and Area
Congregation of Our Lady of Sion
Council of Canadians
County Sustainability Group
Cowichan Valley Chapter of the Council of Canadians
Denman Island Peace Group
Development and Peace
Edmonton Chapter of the Council of Canadians
Fédération des femmes du Québec Greenspiration
First United Church, Salmon Arm, BC
Group of 78
Inter-Church Uranium Committee Educational Co-operative
Inverness County, N.S., Council of Canadians
Kent County NB Chapter, Council of Canadians 
Knox United Church, Calgary
National Council of Women of Canada 
London, ON Chapter, Council of Canadians 
Mission and Social Justice Committee, St. Basil’s Catholic Parish, Ottawa 
Montreal Chapter, Council of Canadians
Ontario Clean Air Alliance
Pax Christi Montreal
Pax Christi Toronto
Peace Quest Cape Breton
PEI Chapter, Council of Canadians
People For Peace (London, ON) 
Peterborough and Kawarthas Chapter of the Council of Canadians
Physicians for Global Survival
Ploughshares Calgary Society
Powell River Chapter, Council of Canadians
Project Ploughshares
Project Ploughshares Saskatoon
Quill Plains (Wynyard), SK, Council of Canadians
Religions for Peace Canada
new Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada
The Rideau Institute
Saskatoon Chapter, Council of Canadians
Saskatoon Parklands Eco-left Collective
Saskatoon Peace Coalition
Science for Peace
Sierra Club of Ontario
Sisters of Charity – Halifax
Sisters of Service of Canada
Social Environmental Alliance (Victoria)
Soka Gakkai International Association of Canada
South Niagara, ON Chapter, Council of Canadians
South Shore, NS Chapter, Council of Canadians
St. Andrews United Church, Calgary
St. David’s United Church, Calgary
The United Church of Canada
Ursuline Sisters of Bruno
Vancouver Island Peace and Disarmament Network
Veterans Against Nuclear Arms – Saskatoon 
Victoria-Council of Canadians
Westmount Initiative for Peace/Initiative de Westmount pour la paix
Women’s Healthy Environments Network (WHEN)
Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom – Canadian Section
World Federalist Movement – Canada

Resources: Divesting from Companies producing Nuclear Weapons

Move the Nuclear Weapons Money booklet published by Internaitonal Peace Bureau (IPB), Parliamentarians for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament (PNND), and World Futures Council (WFC)
Brochure on Nuclear Divestment written by Hallgeir Langeland, Member of the Norwegian Parliament Keith Locke, Member of the New Zealand Parliament. 
Don’t Bank on the Bomb – a Dutch group offering resources on nuclear divestment. See their 2016 Report published by PAX, The Netherlands, with research by Profundo in The Netherlands.
Powerpoint Presentation by Kerry Duncan McCarney introducing key resources available on divestment.
Powerpoint presentation on Activist Investing by Devan Legare, CFP, CPA, CMA of Manulife Securities in Calgary describing investor activism, what are the different types of activism and the impacts on corporate policies.
Handout explaining divestment concept and offering a graphic of the top 10 nuclear-weapons producing companies; call on people to review their investments.

 

Getting Involved

What can YOU do to help abolish nuclear weapons?

Here are some steps you can take to support the Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons:

  1. Spread the word. Talk about the need to abolish nuclear weapons with your family and friends, in your neighbourhood, faith group or workplace. Share the documents from our website with your contacts.
  2. Divest from companies producing nuclear weapons. See our divestment page of resources: here.
  3. Educate yourself on the basic facts. Spend time on this website or any of the many other good resource sites.
    Here are a few others you can look through:

  4. Inform the Prime Minister and your Member of Parliament of your concern (no postage necessary). Ask them to support the goal of the CNANW. To find your Member of Parliament, go to the parliamentary website. Sample letter here. Hand your MP a background briefing document (rtf format; pdf format).
  5. Inform the House of Commons of your concern: Circulate a petition urging support for the abolition of nuclear weapons by all states, and ask your M.P. to present it to Parliament. (A sample petition is available on this website.)
  6. Individuals are invited to join one or more of our member groups.
  7. Community organizations, faith groups and unions are invited to endorse the goals of the CNANW.
  8. Make a donation to organizations that are working to abolish nuclear weapons.
  9. Make a donation to support the CNANW.

Email us for details at: cnanw [at] web.ca

CNANW Call September 2017

INDIVIDUALS supporting Canada signing a Treaty to prohibit nuclear weapons can petition Prime Minister Trudeau [here]. For ORGANIZATIONAL endorsements of the Call, contact Bev Delong. To see the list of groups that have signed: [here].

APPEL AU CANADA À SIGNER LE TRAITÉ D’INTERDICTION DES ARMES NUCLÉAIRES: [ICI] [QF]

Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons CALL ON CANADA TO SIGN The Treaty on The Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons
[CALL] [FAQ] [ad in the Hill Times]
List of signatories to this call [here]

On July 7, 2017, 122 nations, in an historic action, voted at the U.N. to adopt a Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. The Treaty prohibits the use, threat of use, development, testing, production, manufacturing and possession of nuclear weapons.  Nuclear weapons have been unconditionally stigmatized as standing outside international humanitarian law. Governments and civil society have together recognized the “catastrophic humanitarian and environmental consequences” of the use of any nuclear weapon.

When 50 states have ratified it, the Treaty will enter into force and all the States Parties will be committed to “measures for the verified, time-bound and irreversible elimination of nuclear-weapon programmes.” The U.N. High Representative for Disarmament, Izumi Nakamitsu, hailed the Treaty as “a beacon of hope for all those who have dedicated their lives to the pursuit of a nuclear weapon-free world.”

But the nuclear weapon states oppose the treaty, claiming it is “premature” and will undermine existing legal instruments for disarmament. This opposition is groundless; actually the new Treaty will shore up the beleaguered Non-Proliferation Treaty, which the nuclear weapon states have defied for nearly fifty years by refusing to meet their legal obligation to pursue good faith comprehensive negotiations to eliminate nuclear weapons.
The existing NATO nuclear policies, holding that nuclear weapons are the “supreme guarantee” of security, are another obstacle for NATO states to sign the Treaty. Canada must now decide if NATO nuclear policies will be given a higher priority than the country’s longstanding “unequivocal undertaking” to negotiations for the elimination of nuclear weapons.

We call on the Government of Canada to sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons and to state that Canada will, through dialogue and changes to its own policies and practices, persist in its efforts to bring NATO into conformity with the Treaty, with a view to Canada ratifying the Treaty as soon as possible.

We also call on Canada to re-energize its commitment to nuclear disarmament, specifically by enlarging its work internationally on nuclear disarmament verification and leading efforts to initiate negotiations for a Fissile Material Treaty in the U.N. General Assembly in 2018.

Energizing Action By Canada, September 2017

The Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW)

Energizing Action by Canada to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

Monday, September 25, 2017
Cartier Hotel, Ottawa

Welcome, and time of remembrance: Bev Delong, Chairperson, CNANW

Keynote address:

Chairperson: Debbie Grisdale, Canadians for a Nuclear Weapons Convention

Ambassador Elayne Whyte-Gómez, Costa Rica, President, Conference negotiating the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons
Presentation: here

Forward Steps in Nuclear Disarmament:

Chairperson: Douglas Roche O.C.

“Diplomatic Reflections at this Historic Moment”,
Mr. Michael Hurley, Deputy Head of Mission, Embassy of Ireland to Canada

“Nuclear Weapons Prohibition Treaty: Transparency and Risk Reduction”,
Mr. Tariq Rauf, Head – Verification and Security Policy Coordination, Office reporting to the Director General, International Atomic Energy Agency, 2002-2011; Alternate Head of IAEA NPT Delegation.

Luncheon Keynote:

Moderator: Dr. Adele Buckley, Canadian Pugwash Group

Alyn Ware: “2018 UN High Level Conference on Nuclear Disarmament”
Presentation: here

Canadian Government Views on next steps to Nuclear Disarmament:

Chairperson: Peggy Mason, Rideau Institute

Mr. Martin Larose, Director, Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Division, Global Affairs Canada

Ms. Cori Anderson, Deputy Director of Strategic Analysis, Department of National Defence: here

1st Discussant: Mr. Paul Meyer, Adjunct Professor, Simon Fraser University; Senior Fellow, The Simons Foundation; former Ambassador for Disarmament

Presentation: here

Building Momentum for Nuclear Disarmament Conference Oct 24 2016

Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW)
Building Momentum for Nuclear Disarmament

October 24, 2016, Cartier Place Suite Hotel, Ottawa

Conference Report (long version, English)
Conference Report (short version, English)
Rapport de la conférence en français

Panel: Canada:  Between NATO and the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)

Chairperson: Dr. Nancy Covington, Physicians for Global Survival and VOW.

Mr. Marius Grinius, former Ambassador for Disarmament [Presentation here]

Representative, Department of National Defence (invited)

Prof. Erika Simpson, Dept. of Political Science, University of Western Ontario [Presentation here]

Panel: Partnering with Russia for Nuclear Disarmament

Chairperson – Mr. Earl Turcotte, Group of 78

Dr. Metta Spencer, President, Science for Peace [Presentation here]

Dr. Joan DeBardeleben, Chancellor’s Professor, Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Carleton University, Ottawa [Presentation here soon]

Prof. Sergei Plekhanov, Dept. of Political Science, York University

Panel: Nuclear Disarmament:  Diplomatic Options

Chairperson:  Ms. Janis Alton, Canadian Voice of Women for Peace

Mr. Bernhard Faustenhammer, Deputy Head of Mission, Embassy of Austria.

Ms. Heidi Hulan, Director General, International Security Policy, Global Affairs Canada,

Prof. Paul Meyer, former Ambassador for Disarmament, Adjunct Professor, School for International Studies at Simon Fraser University and Senior Fellow, The Simons Foundation. [Presentation here]

Panel: The Crisis with Nuclear Weapons:  Parliamentary & Civil Society Responses

Chairperson:  Ms. Maddie Webb, Canadian Federation of University Women

Mr. Alyn Ware, Global Coordinator, Parliamentarians for Nuclear NonProliferation and Disarmament (PNND)d (by skype)

Mr. Paul Dewar, Member, Global Council, PNND; former Canadian Member of Parliament. [Presentation here]

Ms. Peggy Mason, President, The Rideau Institute; former Canadian Ambassador for Disarmament [Presentation here soon]

Mr. Cesar Jaramillo, Executive Director, Project Ploughshares.

CNANW Endorsers

The following organizations have endorsed the goal of the CNANW

African Community of Calgary
Alberta Greens
Alberta Teachers’ Association
Alberta Wilderness Association
Anglican Church of Canada, Eco-Justice Committee
Anglican Diocese of Calgary
Anglican Diocese of Calgary, Peace and Justice Committee
Association of United Ukrainian Canadians
Bahá’i Community of Canada
Bethel Lutheran Church, Ryley AB
Bridgewater Town Council, NS
Calgary and District Labour Council
Calgary and District Labour Council, Women’s Committee
Calgary Board of Education
Calgary Catholic Immigration Society
Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association
Cambodia War Amputees Rehabilitation Society
Canada Tibet Committee, Calgary
Canadian Action for Indonesia and East Timor – Calgary Branch
Canadian Auto Workers
Canadian Catholic Organization for Development and Peace
Canadian Federation of Students
Canadian Federation of University Women
Canadian Friends Service Committee
Canadian Islamic Congress
Canadian Labour Congress
Canadian Lutheran World Relief
Canadian Public Health Association
Canadian Rockies Alpine Group (CRAG)
Canadian Teachers’ Federation / Fédèration Canadienne des Enseignantes et des Enseignants
Canadian Union of Postal Workers
Christ Trinity Lutheran Church
Centre for Positive Living, Calgary
Club Red
Coalition to Oppose the Arms Trade
Conscience Canada Inc.
Denman Island Peace Group
Dynacan Oil Corporation
East Timor Alert Network – Calgary Branch
Educating for Peace, Ottawa
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, Synod of Alberta and the Northwest Territories
The Finnish Organization of Canada
First Pilgrim United Church, Outreach Committee, Hamilton
First Unitarian Congregation of Ottawa
Four Worlds Center for Development Learning
Franciscans of Western Canada
Friends of the Oldman River
Grace Lutheran Church
Gandhi Society of Calgary
Group of 78
Halifax Regional Municipal Council
Highwood Lutheran Church
Hiroshima Day Coalition
Holden Lutheran Church
Holy Spirit Catholic Women’s League (Saskatoon)
Holy Spirit Lutheran Church
Interchurch Uranium Committee Educational Cooperative
La Comite de Solidarite Tiers-Monde
Lakefield, Village of (ON)
Lethbridge Network for PeaceLunenberg County
Medical Aid for Palestine
Mennonite Central Committee (Canada)
Mount Zion Lutheran Church (Edmonton)
Nanoose Conversion Campaign
Northwatch
Nuclear Awareness Project
Older Women’s Network (Toronto)
Ontario Coalition of Senior Citizens’ Organizations
Outreach Sunnybrook United Church
Pacific Campaign for Disarmament and Security
Parkdale United Church, Faith and Justice Committee
Parkdale United Church, United Church Women, Unit #1
Peace/Ploughshares Group, First Unitarian Congregation (Toronto)
Peace Research, The Canadian Journal of Peace Studies, Editorial Board
People’s Voice Press Club
Peterborough, City of (ON)
Peterborough, County of (ON)
Physicians for Global Survival (Calgary)
Presbyterian Church in Canada – 124th General Assembly
Programme de développement Cambodge-Canada/Canada Cambodia Development Program
Project Peacemakers Winnipeg
Project Ploughshares Calgary
Project Ploughshares Edmonton
Project Ploughshares Fredericton
Project Ploughshares Hamilton
Project Ploughshares Kawartha
Project Ploughshares Saskatoon
Project Ploughshares St. Thomas
Raging Grannies Toronto
Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), Calgary Monthly Meeting
Results / Resultats Canada
Riverview United Church, Church in the World Division
Robert McClure United Church Women, Calgary
Rotary Club – Calgary North
Saskatoon, City of
Saskatchewan Federation of Labour
Saskatoon Seniors for Peace
Save the Children (Canada)
Sisters, Faithful Companions of Jesus
SPHERE (Society for Protection of Healthy Environment and Rejuvenation of Earth)
St. Matthew’s United Church Board
St. Matthew’s United Church Women
Tibetan Community of Alberta
Tollefson Engineering Enterprises Limited
Union of Spiritual Communities of Christ (Doukhobors)
Unitarian Church, Social Justice Committee, Calgary
Unitarian Church, Social Action Coordinating Committee, Saskatoon
United Church of Canada, 36th General Council (1997)
United Church of Canada, Division of Church in Society for AB and NT
United Church of Canada, Saskatchewan Conference
United Nations Association in Canada – National Capital Region Branch
United Nations Association in Canada – Kootenay Region
University of Calgary Eco Club
Veterans Against Nuclear Arms (VANA) Edmonton
VANA Montreal
VANA New Brunswick
VANA Nova Scotia
VANA Ottawa
VANA Saskatoon
VANA Toronto
VANA Winnipeg
VANA Vancouver
VANA Victoria
Victoria Council of Women
Westmount Initiative for Peace
Women in Action, Students’ Assoc’n. Mount Royal College, Calgary
Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom – BC
Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom – Ottawa Branch
Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom – Toronto Branch
World Conference on Religion & Peace (Canada)
World Conference on Religion & Peace (Ottawa)
World Federalists of Canada – Montreal
World Without Wars and Violence
YMCA Calgary
Youth Action for Peace

 

March 1, 2011

CNANW Seminar “Defining Steps for Canada in a Nuclear Weapons-Free World” Nov 2015

The reality of a new Government in Canada provides a new opportunity for CNANW to make an impact on the development of Canada’s nuclear weapons policies. Building on the unanimous motion of Parliament adopted in 2010 to support the UN Secretary General’s Five Point Plan for Nuclear Disarmament and take a major diplomatic initiative to advance nuclear disarmament objectives, the Seminar explored Canadian action concerning the Humanitarian Pledge and development of effective legal measures for the prohibition and elimination of nuclear weapons.

Ottawa, November 30, 2015

Letter from Seminar to Government of Canada: English; Francais
Seminar Report: Linked here

Keynote Speakers:


Tarja Cronberg and Tariq Rauf

Seminar Program: linked here

Keynote Address by Tarja Cronberg: “Creating the Framework for a Nuclear Weapons-Free World” (linked here)

Keynote Luncheon Address by Dr. Tariq Rauf:  “Challenges for Canada’s Nuclear Weapons Policies” (linked here)

Panel: “The Moral Compass and the Humanitarian Pledge”
Mr. Bernhard Faustenhammer: “Progress on, and Plans for Pursuing the Humanitarian Pledge”
Prof. Paul Meyer: “After the Humanitarian Pledge, What?” (linked here)

Panel: “Securing a Nuclear Weapons-Free World: Creating and retaining the replacement regime”
Biographies of panelists (linked here)
Dr. H. Peter Langille: “Sustainable Common Security” (linked here)
Dr. Walter Dorn: “Peacekeeping”
Prof. Peter Jones: “Track Two Diplomacy”

Panel: “Political and Legal Steps: New Initiatives for Canada”
Hon. Douglas Roche: “Political and Legal Steps: New Initiatives for Canada” (linked here)
Heidi Hulan
Cesar Jaramillo
Earl Turcotte: (linked here)

Donate

Donation by Mail or Fax

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Print this form and send with a cheque or credit card information to: CNANW
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140 Westmount Road North,
Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.  N2L 3G6

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Thank you for your support.

Links

(Weblinks are arranged alphabetically)

Canadian Peace and Research Groups:
Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace
Canadian Peace Alliance
Canadian Peace Research and Education Association
Canadian Pugwash Group
Coalition to Oppose the Arms Trade
End the Arms Race
The Markland Group deals with state compliance with international treaties
No Nukes!
Peace Brigades International – Canada
Physicians for Global Survival
Project Ploughshares (National Office)
Science for Peace
United Nations Association in Canada
Vancouver Island Peace Society – Nuclear Warships Litigation
Victoria Peace Centre

International Peace and Peace Research Groups:
Abolition 2000
The Acronym Institute (UK)
Back from the Brink
British American Security Information Council
Disarmament and Security Centre
Federation of American Scientists
International Association of Lawyers Against Nuclear Arms (IALANA)
International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICANW)
International Committee of the Red Cross
International Network of Engineers and Scientists against Proliferation
International Peace Bureau
International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War
The Middle Powers Initiative
NGO (Non-Governmental Organizations) Committee on Disarmament
(Monitoring disarmament progress at the UN.)
Nuclear Age Peace Foundation
Parliamentary Network for Nuclear Disarmament
Pugwash
Reaching Critical Will
Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
Union of Concerned Scientists

International Institutions:
The African Union
The Arctic Council
The Commonwealth
La Francophonie
NATO
Organization of American States
OSCE Parliamentary Assembly
UN & International Law
United Nations
United Nations News

Missile Control Technology Regime:
Arms Control Association site
FAS site
MCTR chronology (pdf file)
SIPRI site
United States government site

Nuclear Posture Review:
Carnegie Endowment report
Disarmament Diplomacy article
IPPNW report: How the NPR Repudiates the NPT
Physicians for Social Responsibility article
Ploughshares Letter to the Prime Minister, march 2002
Western States Legal Foundation article

Peace Publications:
Most of our supporting groups publish regular newsletters – so we encourage you to join a group and get their information. CNANW members.
Arms Control Today is the Magaizine of the Arms Control Association (USA).
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists is a well-respected American publication covering nuclear weapons issues, other weapons of mass destruction and international affairs.
Disarmament Diplomacy is the the journal of the Acronym Institute for Disarmament Diplomacy since 1997.
Peace Magazine is an important national publication providing a discussion of current issues on war and peace.
Ploughshares Monitor is the magazine of Project Ploughshares, a national peace education and research group operated out of a head office in Waterloo, Ontario. The Ploughshares Monitor is published quarterly and contains excellent academic, educational and activist information. For further information, email: plough@ploughshares.ca

Polls:
Poll of Canadian public opinion on nuclear weapons (1998)
May 2002 Global Poll Shows World Perceived As More Dangerous Place

Treaty Sites:
Federation of American Scientists arms control agreements site
Parliamentary Network for Nuclear Disarmament
Treaty texts
UN treaty site

Verification Sites:
Cooperative Monitoring center run out of Sandia
Dismantling the Bomb and Managing the Nuclear Materials
UNIDIR ongoing projects: Handbook on Verification and Compliance,
Tactical Nuclear Weapons Project, Fissile Materials, Missiles and Missile Defences,
Expert Group on Missiles
VERTIC promotes effective and efficient verification as a means of ensuring confidence in the implementation of international agreements.

Weapon site maps/Mapping the effects of nuclear bombs:
Blast mapper 
Historical map of military fissile material and nuclear weapons programs
Nuclear radiation effects (Joint U.S.-Japan site)
Nuclear weapon effects
Snapshot of what a nuclear attack on Russia would do
Study on deaths at a nuclear weapon production facility
US Active NW sites

Other Sources:
“Battle for the Planet”, Report of the Third Global Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates
Canada, NATO and Nuclear Weapons, by Senator Douglas Roche, O.C.
Canadian Department of National Defence (DND)
Find Your Member of Parliament
Genie in the Bottle video
Guidelines for Circulating Petitions
MPI Consultation Report: “Priorities for Preserving the NPT”
Priorities for Preserving the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty in the New Strategic Context

CNANW Meeting, May 2014

Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW) Meeting
May 13 and 14, 2014

Representatives of 10 of the CNANW’s member groups met in Ottawa for a lively update on recent progress and a highly informed discussion on the proposals for legal options with respect to nuclear weapons.

Paul Dewar, M.P., recently elected Global Co-President of Parliamentarians for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament (PNND), joined us to provide a briefing on recent work of that group.  He had participated in the recent Annual Assembly of PNND in Washington in February 25-27, 2014.  We are pleased to hear of the appointment of two new CoChairpersons of PNND Canada, Linda Duncan, M.P. (NDP) and Blaine Calkins, M.P. (Cons.) both Albertans. Mr. Dewar encouraged us to continue with education of the public and of MPs through direct meetings and especially fora such as the Standing Committees on Foreign Affairs and National Defence.

Good news was shared of an Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) resolution from the March 20, 2014 meeting that involved representatives of 160 Parliaments. Blaine Calkins M.P. of Canada worked for this resolution called Toward a Nuclear Weapon Free World: The Contribution of Parliaments. One of the recommendations was that “parliaments urge their governments to start negotiations on a nuclear weapons convention or on a package of agreements to help achieve a nuclear-weapon-free world.” PNND are exploring through national conferences how to implement the resolution.  Hedy Fry M.P. is working through the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) to support PNND initiatives.

The people of the Marshall Islands are suing all nine nuclear-armed states.  Background on the case and information for the media is available from Nuclear Age Peace Foundation as linked on this quite incredible David and Goliath case. We need to determine if CNANW (or its individual member groups will endorse the action, and identify any other ways Canadians can support the action.  There is a possibility that individual affirmations might be filed with the court.  The court has yet to determine the process.

We received briefings on the recent NPT PrepCom meeting and the Nayarit, Mexico meeting on humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons.

We are pleased to note that there are now over 750 Order of Canada members supporting Canadians for a Nuclear Weapons Convention.

CNANW is aiming primarily to communicate to the public and the government our deep concern over the need for Nuclear Weapons Convention by organizing activities

1) for Hiroshima/Nagasaki commemorations on Aug. 6 and 9th
and
2) then during the period  September 21 (International Day for Peace) and September 26 (International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons).  Project Ploughshares is willing to continue to upload worship resources for all faith groups at its website so that faith communities across Canada can have materials to use for either the International Day of Peace or the International Day for the Total Elimination for Nuclear Weapons. We hope to encourage observance of these days in all faith groups.

Thereafter we will focus on preparation for the NPT Review Conference in the spring of 2015 and the spring or fall federal election.

Our lengthiest discussion was on the Ban Treaty proposal. We had the benefit of highly informed input from three former Ambassadors for Disarmament and several other very senior experts with experience with treaty negotiations.  The Ban Treaty proponents are calling for a legal instrument setting out a prohibition against use, possession (etc.) of nuclear weapons.  But that instrument will not set out a process for verified elimination of nuclear weapons since this would require buy-in from nuclear-dependent states, which have made it clear that they consider it “premature”.  The anticipated Nuclear Weapons Convention will call for both prohibitions and a process of verified elimination of nuclear weapons.  A paper was circulated in advance setting out the implications of the Ban Treaty proposal for our work. Concern was expressed about the Ban Treaty being redundant, likely to divert scarce NGO time and resources, likely to cause confusion, and possibly disillusionment among the public.  Others argued that the Ban Treaty proposal would not only engage the public and provide a tool for progress, but might support the longstanding pursuit of a NWC, which seems impossible to achieve in the current state of affairs.

The meeting accepted a proposal that 1) CNANW should take the position that the ban treaty could encourage progress toward a multilateral treaty with specific timelines for nuclear disarmament.  2) While individual CNANW member groups may choose to emphasize a Ban Treaty or the NWC, they are encouraged to be informed on implications of their options to practice “truth in advocacy” in public education and to clarify what process and results are being sought (thus, a ban with or without the elimination of nuclear weapons).  3) As a network, CNANW will continue to focus on a Nuclear Weapons Convention.  4)  Activists are encouraged to call on all states to comply with the Non-Proliferation Treaty, recognizing that the prohibitions and safeguards it creates are restricting the spread of nuclear weapons.

Congratulations to Doug Roche on the launch of his new book Peacemakers: How People Around the World Are Building a World Free of War.

For more information on the work of CNANW, please contact Bev Delon  at bevdelong [at] shaw.ca

The Cuban Missile Crisis, Iran, and the value of negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament, Oct 2012

The Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons met on Oct. 19, 2012 in Ottawa on the 50th Anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis.  This report is written to provide you with the key lessons from the meeting.

What are the lessons of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis for Iran and the value of pursuing urgent negotiations on nuclear disarmament? The analysis presented by Prof. Erika Simpson of the Department of Political Science at Western University explained some of the ‘new lessons’ revisionists are putting forward concerning the Cuban missile crisis fifty years later, now that the historical records and transcripts are being fully revealed. It discussed the implications of these sorts of ‘lessons’ for ‘realists’–who continue to support nuclear deterrence– and ‘idealists’ who counsel urgent nuclear disarmament. Then Prof. Simpson considered the implications of all these types of lessons for the present-day stand-off between Iran and the rest of the international community, especially the United States and Israel, for deterrence and arms control negotiations. She argued that the principal lesson of the Cuban missile crisis, interpreted fifty years later, is that disarmament negotiations need to be urgently pursued now, not during or in the wake of a similar nuclear crisis besetting the world.

In a comment from the floor, Dr. Walter Dorn of Canadian Forces College advised that research in the UN archives that he and Robert Pauk have completed has shown that President Kennedy in fact was fearful during the Cuban Missile Crisis that his actions might trigger a nuclear war.  He sought the assistance of UN Secretary General U Thant to mediate and this mediation occurred successfully.  Contrary to frequent reports of the crisis, Krushchev did not “blink” but rather engaged with U Thant in a deal under which the Soviet Union would withdraw its navy in exchange for the US withdrawing its missiles from Turkey.

Of concern to the group was the recent announcement by the Government of Canada of the closure of the Canadian Embassy in Iran.  Senator Roche, Chairperson of the Middle Powers Initiative questioned “what would have happened during the Cuban Missile Crisis if the Kennedy Administration had broken diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union when the US discovered Soviet missile sites in Cuba?”  He stressed that international security is not served by breaking relations with Iran. He also queried Canada tolerating nuclear weapons in the hands of Israel, India and Pakistan but objecting to Iran. We need strong diplomacy toward nuclear disarmament if we want to influence world security.

Mr. Paul Dewar, the NDP Foreign Affairs Critic, reported on his recent trip to Kazakhstan as part of a delegation from Parliamentarians for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament.  He said most of them were unaware of the human suffering resulting in that area due to the legacy of Soviet nuclear testing in Semipalitinsk.  During his visit on August 29th, thousands of people were out to line the streets to observe somberly the International Day Against Nuclear Testing.  Mr. Dewar was shocked to see volumes of detailed records in Russian setting out the medical results of the testing. Recently people have become much more aware of the 2nd and 3rd generational effects of nuclear testing and the extraordinary toll this is having on the lives and health of people living in Kazakhstan, as well as in other locations where nuclear explosions have occurred such as Japan, the Marshall Islands, and in Tahiti and Muroroa in the Pacific.

Both Mr. Dewar and Mr. Alyn Ware, the Global Coordinator for PNND, spoke on the PNND Parliamentarians statement being circulated to encourage parliamentarians to consider a proposal for a Middle East Zone free of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction as a diplomatic and even-handed route toward a more peaceful Middle East.  Alyn Ware  highlighted the powerful role played by the process of establishing nuclear weapon-free zones in the Antarctic, Latin America, the South Pacific, South East Asia, Africa, Mongolia, and most recently Kazakhstan along with 4 of their “stan” neighbours.  (For further information, check the NWFZs website  located at

http://www.opanal.org.)

Climate modeling research conducted by Toon and Roebuck in the US concludes that waiting for a crisis for the start of nuclear negotiations could cause a calamity, for even a small exchange of 100 nuclear weapons between India and Pakistan or in the Middle East might result in climate change resulting in global famine.  (See “Local Nuclear War, Global Suffering”, Scientific American, December, 2009.

So what then are some of the lessons in 2012 from the Cuban missile crisis, considered by many to have been the most dangerous time in our history?  What then have we learned over the past 60 years that teaches us about our security today?

First, the nuclear threat still remains as there are still approximately 20,000 nuclear weapons in the world. Of these, about 2,000 are on alert, operationally ready be used in under 30 minutes.

Second, the world can be placed at extraordinary risk due to political games leading to military brinkmanship.  Those involved may have serious misperceptions about the facts of the situation and the motives of other parties. Do not assume that leaders will be rational actors during a crisis.

Third, we need to ensure that the UN Secretary General’s capacity to offer his or her good offices remains strong.

Fourth, If we wish to retain a capacity to save humanity and the environment, we need to retain diplomatic lines of communication with other states.  You might contact the Prime Minister your MP and encourage them to reconsider the decision to close the Canadian Embassy in Iran, reminding of the great value of diplomacy for nonviolent solutions in instances of political challenges.

Fifth, and perhaps most importantly, we cannot wait for this to happen.  We must demand negotiations on nuclear disarmament now.

What else can be done?  The Canadian Senate and Parliament in 2010 passed unanimously an historic motion to:

  • “encourage the Government of Canada to deploy a major world-wide Canadian diplomatic initiative in support of preventing nuclear proliferation and increasing the rate of nuclear disarmament;”

Despite repeated requests and petitions, no such initiative has been deployed by the Government of Canada.  Concerned Canadians are encouraged to contact their MP and inquire what they are doing to encourage negotiations on a ban on nuclear weapons. Likewise, Members of Parliament can be urged to consider realistic options for peace in the Middle East and then invited to sign the  Joint Parliamentary Statement for a Middle East Free from Nuclear Weapons and all other Weapons of Mass Destruction available in English or French.

Round Table on a Global Ban on Nuclear Weapons, Mar 2012

Ottawa, Canada
March 26, 2012

Statement of the organizers of the CNANW Round Table:
English: 2012RTstatementMar26.doc; 2012RTstatementMar26.rtf
en Français: 2012Declaration4avril.doc

Session 1: NPT Preparatory Committee Meeting 2012: Opportunities? Challenges?
Chairperson: Ms. Peggy Mason
Summary of this session: 2012 RT NPT.doc; 2012 RT NPT.pages
Opening Statement: Ms. Isabelle Roy, Director, Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Division, DFAIT: RoyMarch26.docx
Panel Responding: The Hon. Doug Roche O.C., Acting Chairperson, Middle Powers Initiative (MPI): RocheMar26.doc and RocheMar26.doc.odt
and Mr. Cesar Jaramillo, Program Officer, Project Ploughshares
Rapporteur: Dr. Anna Jaikaran, Science for Peace

Session 2: Iran and the Nuclear Question
Chairperson: Mr. Fergus Watt, World Federalist Movement – Canada
Panel: Mr. Paul Heinbecker, CIGI Distinguished Fellow: RTIranSession final.doc and RTIranSessionfinal.pages
and Prof. Peter Jones, University of Ottawa: JonesMarch26.doc and JonesMarch26.pages
Rapporteur: Mr. Cesar Jaramillo, Project Ploughshares

Session 3: International Humanitarian Law and Nuclear Weapons: Progress made; Work ahead?
Chairperson: Ms. Janis Alton, Voice of Women
Speaker: Mr. Ilario Maiolo, Senior Legal Advisor, Canadian Red Cross: MaioloMarch26
Panel: Mr. Robin Collins, World Federalist Movement-Canada: CollinsMarch26.doc
and Ms. Debbie Grisdale, CNANW: GrisdaleMarch26.rtf
Rapporteur: Dr. Richard Denton, Physicians for Global Survival (PGS)

Session 4: Next steps for CNANW member groups
Chairpersons: The Hon. Doug Roche O.C. and Ms. Bev Delong
Notes circulated among CNANW member groups

roundtable1

 

Statements


  • Restoring Canada’s Nuclear Disarmament Policies Expert Seminar, February 2008:
    • Event Report (english, pdf)
    • Statement (english, pdf)
    • Séminaire d’experts sur la restitution de leadership Canadiene sur le désarmement nucléaire
    • Déclaration (pdf)

    • Text Box: Vers 2010: Priorités en vue d’un consensus à propos du TNP
      • Rapport de l’Initiative des puissances moyennes, Avril 2007
        [MPI Statement to Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs]
      • Mémoire de l’Initiative des puissances moyennes en prévision de la réunion du Comité préparatoire du TNP qui aura lieu à Vienne, en 2007 [rtf; pdf]

    • Canadians Call for End to Nuclear Weapons in NATO/Des Canadiens exigent la suppression du recours à l’armement nucléaire par l’OTAN:






Signatories/Signataires Academic Statement

Signatories/Signataires Academic Statement

Signatories/Signataires (18 mai/May 18 2010):

Beverly Anderson
Associate Professor Emeritus (retired) 
Faculty of Nursing
University of Calgary

Dr. Mary-Wynne Ashford 
Assoc Prof (retired)
School of Child and Youth Care,
University of Victoria.

Hélène Beauchamp
Professeure émérite (retraitée)
École supérieure de théâtre
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Marie Beaulieu Ph.D. Directrice du département de danse Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur Paul Bélanger
Département d’éducation et formation spécialisées
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeure Colette Bellavance
Faculté de médecine et des sciences de la santé
Université de Sherbrooke

Professor Jordan Bishop (retired)
Department of Humanities
Cape Breton University

Professeure Colette Boky
Prix du Québec, O.C.
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Katherine Bonathan (retired)
Kwantlen Polytechnical University
Surrey, BC

Professeure Denise Brassard Département d’Études littéraires Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Carl Braun
Professor Emeritus
Department of Applied Psychology
University of Calgary

Claude Braun, Ph.D.
Professeur titulaire au département de psychologie
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur André Breton
Département des communications
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Merlin B. Brinkerhoff
Professor Emeritus
Department of Sociology
University of Calgary

Professeure Anne-Marie Broudehoux
École de design
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)  

Professor Michael Byers
Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law
University of British Columbia

Professor Max Cameron
Dept. of Political Science
University of British Columbia

Debbie Carroll, PhD, MTA Professeure de Musicothérapie Département de musique Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

André F. Charette, Ph.D. Professeur titulaire
Département d’organisation et ressources humaines École des sciences de la gestion (ESG-UQAM)
Université du Québec à Montréal                                                                                                                                              

Dr. Normand Chevrier
Département de biologie
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Arthur Clark
Professor of Neuropathology
Faculty of Medicine
University of Calgary

Professeur Alessandro Colizzi
École de Design
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Phyllis Creighton
Adjunct faculty
Faculty of Divinity
Trinity College, Toronto

Louis Cyr
Professeur retraité
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Edwin E. Daniel
Professor Emeritus, Adjunct Professor
Dept. of Pharmacology
University of Alberta

Professor Dayna B. Daniels
Coordinator, Women’s Studies
University of Lethbridge

Professeure Martine Delvaux Études littéraires
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Emily Doolittle Assistant Professor of Music Composition Cornish College of the Arts – Seattle

Professeur Gilles Dostaler
Département des sciences économiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur François Dragon
Département des sciences biologiques
Université du Québec à Montréal

Professeur Michel Duguay
Ph.D. en physique nucléaire (Yale University)
Département de génie électrique et de génie informatique
Université Laval

Professeure adjointe Carolina Ferrer
Département d’études littéraires
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Trevor Findlay
William and Jeanie Barton Chair in International Affairs
Director, Canadian Centre for Treaty Compliance
Professor, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs
Carleton University

Professeur Hervé Fischer
Fondateur de l’Observatoire international du numérique de Montréal
Chercheur Hexagram
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Jean Fisette Professeur associé Département d’études littéraires
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Ward Flemons
Faculty of Medicine
University of Calgary

Martin Foster
Professeur associé (retraité)
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal

Professeur Jean-Louis Gagnon
Directeur du programme de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Louis Gill
Professeur retraité
Département des sciences économiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeure Jacinthe Giroux Département d’éducation et formation spécialisées Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Trudy Govier 
Department of Philosophy
University of Lethbridge

Professor Donald Grayston
Department of Humanities
Simon Fraser University

Professor Richard Guy
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Calgary

Professeure Nicole Harbonnier-Topin
Département de danse
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Stoody Harding (ret.)
Past Director of School of Human Justice
University of Regina

Professor  Maureen S. G. Hawkins
Department of English
University of Lethbridge

Professor Yvonne Hébert
Faculty of Education
University of Calgary

Professeur Mario Houde
Département des sciences biologiques
Université du Québec à Montréal

Connie Isenberg, Ph.D., MTA, MT-BC,
FAMI Psychologue et psychanalyste Professeur Musicothérapie Département de musique Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur titulaire Pierre Jasmin
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeure Catherine Jumarie, Ph.D
Département des sciences biologiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor  Catherine Kingfisher
Department of Anthropology
University of Lethbridge

Professor John Kirk
Department of Spanish and Latin American Studies
Cape Breton University

Professeure Julie Lafond
Département des Sciences Biologiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur invité Gérald Larose
École de travail social
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)
 
Professeur Pierre Lebuis Département d’éducation et pédagogie Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur émérite Georges Leroux
Département de philosophie
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur Jacques Lévesque
Ancien doyen de la faculté de droit et de science politique
Département de sciences politiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Ernest McCullough (retired)
Faculty of of Arts & Science
St Thomas More College,
University of Saskatchewan

Dr. Peter Meincke
President Emeritus
University of Prince Edward Island

Ray Morris
Professor Emeritus of Sociology
York University

Emeritus Professor Ronald Neufeldt
Department of Religious Studies
University of Calgary

Professeure Michèle Nevert
Département d’études littéraires
Présidente du syndicat des professeures et professeurs de l’UQAM
Université du Québec à Montréal

Professor Jacquetta Newman
Chair, Department of Political Science
King’s University College, UWO
 
Dr. Peter Nicholls,
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Essex,
Colchester, Essex

Professor Mark Nitz
Department Chemistry
University of Toronto

Jean-Pierre Noiseux
Professeur associé
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Emerita Liisa L. North,
Department of Political Science 
York University

Dr Éric Notebaert
Faculté de médecine
Université de Montréal

Prof. James V Penna (ret.)
Faculty of Arts and Science
St. Thomas More College, 
University of Saskatchewan

Professeur émérite Jean-Marc Piotte
Département de science politique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Sergei Plekhanov 
Department of Political Science
York University

Professeure Louise Poissant
Doyenne de la Faculté des Arts
Chercheure à Hexagram
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur Laurent Poliquin Département des Sciences biologiques Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Richard Price
Director, Graduate Program
Department of Political Science
University of British Columbia

Professeure Dominique Primeau
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Emeritus James Ramsay
Department of Psychology
McGill University

Eric Rassart, Ph.D. Département des sciences biologiques Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Ernie Regehr O.C.
Adjunct Associate Professor
Peace and Conflict Studies
Conrad Grebel University College
University of Waterloo.

Professor Dorothy Goldin Rosenberg 
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto

Professeur Max Roy
Université du Québec à Montréal
Président de la Fédération québécoise des professeures
et professeurs d’université (FQPPU)

Joanna Santa Barbara
Assoc. Prof. (retired), 
Psychiatry and Peace Studies
McMaster University

Professeure Lucie Sauvé Titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en éducation relative à l’environnement Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeure Claire Savoie
École des arts visuels et médiatiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor J. Robert Sevick, M.D.
Head, Department of Radiology
Faculty of Medicine
University of Calgary

Professor Elemir Simko
Department of Veterinary Pathology
Western College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Saskatchewan

Dr. Jennifer Simons
Adjunct Professor
School for International Studies
Simon Fraser University

Professor Erika Simpson
Department of Political Science
University of Western Ontario

Professor Emeritus Graham M. Simpson
Department of Plant Sciences
University of Saskatchewan

Dr. Metta Spencer
Professor Emeritus of Sociology
University of Toronto

Professor Hank J. Stam
Department of Psychology
University of Calgary

Professeur Jacques Saint-Pierre Chaire SITQ d’immobilier École des sciences de la gestion Université du Québec à Montréal

Professeure Madeleine Saint-Pierre
retraitée
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. David Swann, M.L.A., 
Leader of the Official Opposition (Alberta)
Former Professor of Public Health,
University of Calgary

Miklós Takács
Professeur associé (retraité)
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Jean-Guy Vaillancourt
Professeur associé au département de sociologie
Prix Michel-Jurdant 2009 de l’ACFAS pour les sciences environnementales
Université de Montréal

Louise Vandelac, Ph.D. Professeure titulaire au département de sociologie et Institut des sciences de l’environnement
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur André Villeneuve
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Michael Wallace
Professor Emeritus
Department of Political Science
University of British Columbia

Professor Maureen G. Wilson
Faculty of Social Work
University of Calgary
Professor Ian Winchester
Emeritus Dean
University of Calgary

Professor Melanie A. Woodin
Department of Cell & Systems Biology
Faculty of Arts & Science 
University of Toronto

Professor Andrew Woolley
Dept of Chemistry
University of Toronto

Professor Deborah Zamble
Department of Chemistry
University of Toronto


Toward a Nuclear Weapons Convention: A Role for Canada, Apr 2011

April 11-12, 2011
Brittany Salon, Cartier Place Suite Hotel, 180 Cooper Street, Ottawa, ON

Summary Report: Toward a Nuclear Weapons Convention: A Role for Canada (pdf in english)

Recommendations: (in english; Vers une convention de l’interdiction des armes nucléaires : un rôle pour le Canada: en français)


April 11: “Implementing the UN Secretary-General’s Five Point Proposal for Nuclear Disarmament”

Program: [here: pdf]

HeadTable podium panaudience

Keynote Speaker: H.E. Ambassador Sergio de Queiroz Duarte, U.N. High Representative for Disarmament “Implementing the UN Secretary-General’s Five Point Proposal for Nuclear Disarmament” [here: pdf]

Chairpersons: The Hon. Douglas J. Roche O.C., Former Canadian Ambassador for Disarmament and Mr. Ernie Regehr, O.C., Research Fellow, Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies, Conrad Grebel University College, University of Waterloo

Respondents:

  • Ambassador Werner Brandstetter, Embassy of Austria [here: pdf]
  • Counsellor Julian Juarez, Embassy of Mexico [here: pdf]
  • Mr. Nicolas Brühl, Deputy Head of Mission, Embassy of Switzerland [here: pdf]
  • Mr. Clive Wright, Head of Foreign Policy Team, British High Commission, Ottawa [here: pdf]

Acknowledgements: We express our sincere gratitude to the sponsors of this seminar: Canadian Network toAbolish Nuclear Weapons, Canadian Pugwash Group, Physicians for Global Survival,Project Ploughshares, and World Federalist Movement – Canada.


April 12: “Experts’ Seminar”

Agenda: [here: pdf]
Theme: The Final Document of the 2010 NPT Review Conference took note of the UNSecretary-General’s Five-Point Proposal for Nuclear Disarmament, which proposes, inter alia, “consideration of negotiations on a Nuclear Weapons Convention or agreement on a framework of separate mutually reinforcing instruments backed by a strong system ofverification.”

This seminar is being held to develop a broadly shared understanding of the mainelements and requirements for a global convention to prohibit nuclear weapons; to buildCanadian capacity in the expert and disarmament advocacy community on key issues linkedto advancing the global movement toward a nuclear weapons convention; and to engage theGovernment of Canada to encourage early and concrete support for working toward aNuclear Weapons Convention.


Legal Aspects of a Nuclear Weapons Convention

Elements of a legal architecture for a nuclear weapons prohibition/framework of agreements.Implications of an International Humanitarian Law approach to progress on NWC

Dr John Burroughs
Dr Erika Simpson
Dr Michael Byers

Chairperson: Dr. Erika Simpson, Department of Political Science, University of Western Ontario and Vice-Chair, Canadian Pugwash Group

Speakers : Dr. John Burroughs, Lawyers Committee on Nuclear Policy [here: pdf] Dr. Michael Byers, Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law,Department of Political Science, University of British Columbia [here: pdf]


Verification and Compliance Aspects of a Nuclear Weapons Convention

Dr Trevor Findlay
Ms Peggy Mason
Mr Jo Sletback

Chairperson:  Ms. Peggy Mason, former Canadian Ambassador for Disarmament and Advisory BoardChair, Canadian Centre for Treaty Compliance, Carleton University

Speakers:  Dr. Trevor Findlay, Director, Canadian Centre for Treaty Compliance [here: pptx (original) pdf] Mr.  Jo Sletbak, Minister Counsellor/Deputy Head of Mission, Royal Norwegian Embassy [here: pdf]


Luncheon Keynote

Amb. Richard Butler
Ms Bev Delong

Chairperson: Ms. Bev Delong, Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

Guest Speaker: H.E. Ambassador Richard Butler, A.C., Chairperson, Middle Powers Initiative [here: pdf]


Political and Security Requirements for a Nuclear Weapons Convention

How can security relationships be used as stepping stones toward a NWC?Delegitimizing Nuclear Weapons through Nuclear Weapons-Free Zones, and Nuclear Doctrines

Mr Ernie Regehr
Mr Simon Rosenblum
Mr Simon Rosenblum, Mr Ernie Regehr, Hon. Landon Pearson

Chairperson: The Honourable Landon Pearson, O.C., member, Canadians for a Nuclear Weapons Convention

Speakers: Mr. Ernie Regehr, O.C., Research Fellow, Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies,Conrad Grebel University College, University of Waterloo; Fellow, The Simons Foundation [here: pdf] Mr. Simon Rosenblum, World Federalist Movement – Canada [here: pdf]


 Roundtable on the Role of Canada

Mr Paul Meyer, Dr Adele Buckley, Hon Douglas Roche

Chairperson: Dr. Adele Buckley, Past Chair, Canadian Pugwash Group

Speakers: Mr. Paul Meyer, former Ambassador for Disarmament; Fellow in International Security,Centre for Dialogue, Simon Fraser University; Senior Fellow, The Simons Foundation [here: pdf] The Honourable Douglas J. Roche, O.C., former Ambassador for Disarmament [here: pdf]


Acknowledgements

Organizing committee:The Honourable Douglas J. Roche, O.C.Mr. Ernie Regehr, O.C.Dr. Dale Dewar, Executive Director, Physicians for Global SurvivalDr. Trevor Findlay, Executive Director, Canadian Centre for Treaty ComplianceMr. Fergus Watt, Executive Director, World Federalists Movement – CanadaMr. Cesar Jaramillo, Program Associate, Project PloughsharesMs. Bev Tollefson Delong, Chairperson, Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

Advisors: Amb. (Ret.) Paul Meyer, Mr. Murray Thomson, O.C. and the late Dr. Michael WallaceAdministrative support: Project Ploughshares

Sponsors: Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, Canadian Pugwash Group,Physicians for Global Survival, Project Ploughshares, World Federalist Movement – Canada

Funders: Canadian Pugwash Group, Canadians for a Nuclear Weapons Convention, Lawyersfor Social Responsibility, Physicians for Global Survival, Project Ploughshares, Science for Peace,Sisters of Service of Canada, anonymous donor.

 

Who we are

The Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW) was established in 1996 by representatives of national organizations that share the conviction that nuclear weapons are immoral and should be abolished. We believe that Canada should lead in working for their early abolition. CNANW’s nineteen member organizations include faith communities, professional groups, peace and women’s organizations — all of whom work in various ways for nuclear abolition. We endorse the following statement:

“We believe that the use and threat of use of nuclear weapons are abhorrent and morally wrong. We call on the Government of Canada to work urgently with other nations to conclude a convention which will set out a binding timetable for the abolition of all nuclear weapons in the world.”

CNANW and its members do work to educate the public, and conduct seminars, consultations and meetings with the public, officials and politicians in Canada and abroad. All this work is with the purpose of advancing the cause of nuclear disarmament and moving the world toward abolition of nuclear weapons.

For a list of links to our member groups: HERE.

Endorsing groups: HERE