END ALL NUCLEAR WEAPON THREATS

Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons statement
on Ukraine and nuclear weapon threats
METTRE FIN À TOUTES LES MENACES D’ARMES NUCLÉAIRES,
en français ci-dessous

CNANW condemns the raised readiness level of the Russian Federation’s strategic nuclear forces to what was described as a “special regime of combat duty.” This followed Russian President Putin’s illegal invasion of Ukraine and was a clear warning to NATO not to intervene in the war. Heightened rhetoric by Putin also included a threat that any interference by other states in Ukraine would result in consequences “such as you have never seen in your entire history.”

Belarus, Russia’s ally in the conflict, has stated that it will abandon its status as a non-nuclear weapon state and will now consider hosting Russian nuclear missiles. 

While the United States indicated it was not responding in-kind and therefore not raising the alert status of its own nuclear arsenal, NATO made clear that any Russian aggression beyond Ukraine into the territory of an alliance member would provoke an immediate response. The risk of escalation to a regional war, including nuclear war, is real and concerning. 

Unfortunately, in late March, US President Biden stepped away from his own previously stated support for a sole purpose (no first use) policy for the American nuclear arsenal. Instead, its “fundamental” role will be to deter nuclear attacks. This ambiguity leaves open options to use nuclear weapons for wider purposes. 

President Putin’s statement is the first public threat of threatened nuclear weapon use during an ongoing military conflict in recent memory. The rise in global risk is unacceptable. The grave humanitarian consequences of even a small nuclear exchange provide no legal, ethical or militarily useful justification for the use or threatened use of nuclear weapons.

Therefore, CNANW calls on the Canadian government to make crystal clear Canada’s long-held opposition to nuclear weapons threats or use, and to contribute to the reduction of rhetoric that could lead to escalation of the current conflict in Ukraine. 

April 28, 2022

METTRE FIN À TOUTES LES MENACES D’ARMES NUCLÉAIRES
Déclaration du Réseau Canadien pour l’Abolition des Armes Nucléaires sur l’Ukraine et les menaces liées aux armes nucléaires

Le RCAAN condamne l’augmentation du niveau de préparation des forces nucléaires stratégiques de la Fédération de Russie à ce qui a été décrit comme un “régime spécial de service de combat”. Cette décision fait suite à l’invasion illégale de l’Ukraine par le président russe Poutine et constitue un avertissement clair à l’OTAN de ne pas intervenir dans cette guerre. Poutine a également menacé, dans sa rhétorique, que toute ingérence d’autres États en Ukraine aurait des conséquences “telles que vous n’en avez jamais vues dans toute votre histoire”.

Le Belarus, allié de la Russie dans le conflit, a déclaré qu’il abandonnerait son statut d’État non doté d’armes nucléaires et envisagerait désormais d’accueillir des missiles nucléaires russes.

Si les États-Unis ont indiqué qu’ils ne répondaient pas en nature et ne relevaient donc pas le niveau d’alerte de leur propre arsenal nucléaire, l’OTAN a clairement indiqué que toute agression russe au-delà de l’Ukraine sur le territoire d’un membre de l’alliance provoquerait une réponse immédiate. Le risque d’escalade vers une guerre régionale, y compris une guerre nucléaire, est réel et préoccupant.

Malheureusement, à la fin du mois de mars, le président américain Biden s’est éloigné de son soutien, précédemment déclaré, à une politique de l’arsenal nucléaire américain à but unique (pas de première utilisation). Au lieu de cela, son rôle “fondamental” sera de dissuader les attaques nucléaires. Cette ambiguïté laisse ouverte la possibilité d’utiliser les armes nucléaires à des fins plus larges.

De mémoire récente, la déclaration du président Poutine est la première menace publique d’utilisation d’une arme nucléaire pendant un conflit militaire. L’augmentation du risque mondial est inacceptable. Les graves conséquences humanitaires d’un échange nucléaire, même minime, ne fournissent aucune justification légale, éthique ou militairement utile pour l’utilisation ou la menace d’utilisation d’armes nucléaires.

Par conséquent, le RCAAN demande au gouvernement canadien d’exprimer clairement l’opposition de longue date du Canada aux menaces ou à l’utilisation d’armes nucléaires, et de contribuer à la réduction de la rhétorique qui pourrait mener à une escalade du conflit actuel en Ukraine.

28 avril 2022

Canadians call on NATO:  Reduce Nuclear Risks

Les Canadien.ne.s demandent à l’OTAN de Réduire les Risques Nucléaires

In June 2022, NATO will conclude a review of its principal “Strategic Concept” policy. Backed by strong science-based information, we urge the Canadian Government to lessen the risk of nuclear weapon use, and emphasize diplomacy in resolving conflicts.

En juin 2022, l’OTAN conclura la révision de sa politique principale relative au “concept stratégique”. Sur la base d’informations scientifiques solides, nous demandons instamment au gouvernement canadien de réduire le risque d’utilisation de l’arme nucléaire et de privilégier la diplomatie pour résoudre les conflits.

Alexa McDonough O.C. (1944-2022)

Tribute on behalf of 
the Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons
Hommage à Alexa McDonough O.C. au nom du Réseau canadien pour l’abolition des armes nucléaires

Alexa McDonough, shown with Hon. Douglas Roche O.C.

ci-dessous en français

Alexa was known within our peace and disarmament community as a persistent advocate for peaceful solutions to international conflicts and, more particularly, as  a champion for nuclear disarmament. CNANW  benefited from her thoughtful participation in several of our expert seminars.

Alexa encouraged and respected our views,  believed they should be addressed constructively in Parliament, and collaborated with us in actions pressing for nuclear disarmament.

At the international level, Alexa served as one of the inaugural Co-Presidents of the Parliamentary Network for Non-proliferation and Nuclear Disarmament (PNND) that then included over 500 parliamentarians in 70 states. Among other actions, Alexa presented to the United Nations the Global Appeal of Mayors and Parliamentarians for a Nuclear Weapon Free World. This initiative received endorsements from 150 Mayors and 250 legislators from 29 countries. Their shared objective was “to protect the security of citizens living within our jurisdictions and to protect our localities for future generations.” No matter the target or user, the statement continued, “no one would escape the calamitous consequences of a nuclear attack. [It] would cause unimaginable devastation requiring massive aid, global effects from nuclear fall-out and a rise in refugees seeking to escape the most contaminated regions.”

After retiring from her role as Co-President of PNND, Alexa continued to meet with the group’s members in Canada and encouraged them to write letters congratulating US legislators on negotiating with Russia, and for efforts to reduce the role of nuclear weapons within the U.S. Nuclear Posture Review.

In Canada, Alexa pressed for peace policies through the New Democratic Party, and she regular raised questions on disarmament in the House of Commons.  While leader of the NDP in 2003 she created a Peace Team of party members, and organized a briefing session to build their expertise.  In 2004, she created an NDP Peace Advocate position and also served in that role.

Alexa assisted in the Canadian launch on Parliament HIll of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), a group that later received the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize for its advocacy of a nuclear weapons prohibition treaty.

 In her Halifax home riding, she shared ideas with many peace groups and participated in vigils and Hiroshima Day events. 

Alexa was an active member of Canadian Pugwash Group and moderated two public fora at their conferences.  Over the years she maintained cordial connections with officials at Thinkers Lodge  and the Town of Pugwash.  After years of persistent lobbying, with Alexa’s help, the community was successful in its effort to have the Mayor of Halifax join Mayors for Peace.  

Upon retirement from politics, as interim President of Mount Saint Vincent University, she chaired the international conference “Being the Change: Building a Culture of Peace”.  In 2013, the University rebranded one of its institutes in her honour as the “Alexa McDonough Institute for Women, Gender and Social Justice.”  

The Honourable Doug Roche O.C. offered these words:

“I would like to join with you and our colleagues in paying heartfelt tribute to Alexa McDonough.  She had a rare combination of qualities in a political leader: she was principled, committed, compassionate and a very nice person all rolled into one. Her leadership in the nuclear disarmament movement was a shining star that guided others.  Pugwash had no greater friend.  Now she and her close friend Macha McKay are both gone.  We are certainly poorer for that, but the light Alexa has left and the love in my heart for her will never fade.

Alyn Ware, Global Coordinator of PNND:  “Alexa was a warm, caring, humble, dedicated, super-smart woman who touched peoples hearts, minds and souls everywhere. Canada and the world are better places for the blessing of Alexa’s presence and her life.”

Libby Davies (MP 1997 – 2015):  “Alexa was a staunch and passionate advocate for peace and disarmament. She led many initiatives to strengthen the voice and work of parliamentarians both in Canada and globally, for nuclear disarmament and non proliferation. Her dedication to this issue was so important in encouraging public awareness to demand that Canada undertake its responsibilities in the international community. Alexa is a wonderful example of the need to continue our struggle for peace and ending the threat of nuclear weapons.”

Prof. Walter Dorn, Canadian Forces College: “ [Alexa] was an inspiring person and a great leader with a very common touch:  popular, highly likable, positive and good natured, plus super devoted to the causes of social justice and world peace.“

Dr. Nancy Covington, Voice of Women for Peace:  “I join with others in admiration of Alexa’s inspiring spirit and shining example of what a public servant can be.  Living in her Halifax riding I witnessed first hand the deep admiration she was given by diverse groups of people. Whether this respect came from the military people who formed a large part of her voting base or from folks of the local peace community, she became their friend, a mentor to many and indeed was almost revered. With her passion for social justice issues, belief that with privilege comes responsibility, social worker training and seemingly boundless energy, she accomplished a lot.   Alexa, we miss you.”  

Sister Mary-Ellen Francoeur of Religions for Peace:  “While the invitation was to speak of her experience of peace, she used the time to speak of her, and the NDP stance, on nuclear weapons. She spoke very powerfully. As always, she also was very gracious and warm. It was such a gift to be with a politician in leadership who was so committed to nuclear weapon abolition.

Prof. Andy Knight, University of Alberta:  “What a wonderful woman and one of the few a genuine politicians at both provincial and federal level. Alexa, in her unassuming way, left a legacy that is formidable.”  

Dr David Harries, Past Chairperson, Canadian Pugwash Group: “Alexa and I did not know each other well. But, for me, she was one of the finest Canadians I ever met. The one face-to-face conversation we had – at Thinkers Lodge, I think, she surprised me by knowing of my military background, and saying (with no provocation from me) that it was “very important” for the military to be fully engaged in peace work. She is the only person who ever said that to me.”

Bev Delong, Past Chairperson of Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons:  “Alexa made us feel very welcome on Parliament Hill, that we had a right, and indeed a duty, to engage with parliamentarians in our work for nuclear abolition.  It was a privilege to receive her invitation to brief the Peace Team. And at our CNANW meetings, we welcomed Alexa’s  intelligent understanding of the world of politics.” 

Peggy Mason, President of the Rideau Institute:  “There is much to think about as we remember her outsized contribution to Canadian public life and women’s place therein. But in the end, it is her warmth, her kindness, her energy and her unfailing wit and humour that I remember the most.”

CNANW offers its sincere thanks to Alexa and hopes that her legacy in peace, disarmament and abolition of nuclear weapons will be honourably carried forward by other courageous Canadian parliamentarians.

Hommage à Alexa McDonough O.C. au nom du
Réseau canadien pour l’abolition des armes nucléaires

Alexa était connue au sein de notre communauté de paix et de désarmement comme une avocate tenace des solutions pacifiques aux conflits internationaux et, plus particulièrement, comme une championne du désarmement nucléaire. Le Réseau canadien pour l’abolition des armes nucléaires (le Réseau) a bénéficié de sa participation réfléchie à plusieurs de nos séminaires d’experts.

Alexa a encouragé et respecté nos points de vue, a estimé qu’ils devaient être abordés de manière constructive au Parlement et a collaboré avec nous dans des actions de pression en faveur du désarmement nucléaire. 
 
Au niveau international, Alexa a été l’une des premières coprésidentes du Réseau des parlementaires pour la non-prolifération et le désarmement nucléaire (« PNND »), qui comptait alors plus de 500 parlementaires dans 70 États. Entre autres actions, Alexa a présenté aux Nations unies l’Appel mondial des maires et des parlementaires pour un monde sans armes nucléaires. Cette initiative a reçu l’aval de 150 maires et 250 législateurs de 29 pays. Leur objectif commun était de “protéger la sécurité des citoyens vivant dans nos juridictions et de protéger nos localités pour les générations futures.” Quelle que soit la cible ou l’utilisateur, poursuit la déclaration, “personne n’échapperait aux conséquences calamiteuses d’une attaque nucléaire. Elle provoquerait une dévastation inimaginable nécessitant une aide massive, des effets mondiaux des retombées nucléaires et une augmentation du nombre de réfugiés cherchant à fuir les régions les plus contaminées.” 

Après s’être retirée de son rôle de coprésidente du PNND, Alexa a continué à rencontrer les membres du groupe au Canada et les a encouragés à écrire des lettres félicitant les législateurs américains pour les négociations avec la Russie et pour les efforts visant à réduire le rôle des armes nucléaires dans le cadre de l’examen de la posture nucléaire des États-Unis (US Nuclear Posture Review). 

Au Canada, Alexa a fait pression pour des politiques de paix par le biais du Nouveau Parti démocratique, et elle a régulièrement soulevé des questions sur le désarmement à la Chambre des communes.  Lorsqu’elle était chef du NPD en 2003, elle a créé une équipe de la paix composée de membres du parti et a organisé une séance d’information pour renforcer leur expertise.  En 2004, elle a créé un poste de défenseur de la paix au sein du NPD et a également occupé cette fonction.
 
Alexa a participé au lancement canadien, sur la colline du Parlement, de la Campagne internationale pour l’abolition des armes nucléaires (ICAN), un groupe qui a reçu le prix Nobel de la paix 2017 pour son plaidoyer en faveur d’un traité d’interdiction des armes nucléaires. 

Dans sa circonscription d’Halifax, elle a échangé avec de nombreux groupes pacifistes et a participé à des veillées et à des manifestations à l’occasion du Jour d’Hiroshima.  

Alexa était un membre actif du groupe canadien Pugwash et a animé deux forums publics lors de leurs conférences.  Au fil des ans, elle a entretenu des relations cordiales avec les responsables de la maison Thinkers Lodge et de la ville de Pugwash. Après des années de lobbying persistant, la communauté a réussi à faire en sorte que le maire d’Halifax se joigne à Maires pour la Paix grâce en partie à l’aide d’Alexa.   

Après s’être retirée de la vie politique et en tant que présidente par intérim de l’université Mount Saint Vincent, elle a guidé la conférence internationale « Être le Changement : Construire une culture de paix » (“Being the Change : Building a Culture of Peace”.)  En 2013, l’Université a rebaptisé l’un de ses instituts en son honneur : ” Alexa McDonough Institute for Women, Gender and Social Justice “.   

L’honorable Doug Roche, O.C., a prononcé, « j’aimerais me joindre à vous et à nos collègues pour rendre un hommage sincère à Alexa McDonough. Elle possédait une combinaison rare de qualités chez un leader politique : elle avait des principes, était engagée et compatissante en plus d’ëtre une personne très sympathique, le tout réuni en une seule personne. Son leadership dans le mouvement pour le désarmement nucléaire a été une étoile brillante qui a en guidé plusieurs. Pugwash n’avait pas de meilleur ami. Aujourd’hui, elle et son amie intime Macha McKay ont toutes deux disparues.  Deux grandes pertes, mais la lumière qu’Alexa a laissée et l’amour que j’ai pour elle dans mon cœur ne s’éteindront jamais. »

Alyn Ware, coordinateur mondiale du PNND a partagé, « Alexa était une femme chaleureuse, attentionnée, humble, dévouée et super intelligente qui a touché les cœurs, les esprits et les âmes des gens partout dans le monde. Le Canada et le monde sont de meilleurs endroits grâce à la bénédiction de la présence d’Alexa et de sa vie. »

Libby Davies (députée de 1997 à 2015) a souligné qu’« Alexa était une défenseuse de la paix et du désarmement ardente et passionnée. Elle a mené de nombreuses initiatives pour renforcer la voix et le travail des parlementaires, tant au Canada qu’à l’échelle mondiale, en faveur du désarmement nucléaire et de la non-prolifération. Son dévouement à cette cause a joué un rôle déterminant dans la sensibilisation du public, qui a exigé que le Canada assume ses responsabilités au sein de la communauté internationale. Alexa est un merveilleux exemple de la nécessité de poursuivre notre lutte pour la paix et l’élimination de la menace des armes nucléaires. » 

Le professeur Walter Dorn du Collège des Forces canadiennes a écrit, « Alexa était une personne inspirante et un grand leader avec une touche très commune : populaire, très sympathique, positive et de bonne nature, et super dévouée aux causes de la justice sociale et de la paix mondiale. »

Dr Nancy Covington, Voix des femmes pour la paix a déclaré, « je me joins aux autres personnes qui admirent l’esprit stimulant d’Alexa et son exemple brillant de ce que peut être un fonctionnaire. Vivant dans sa circonscription d’Halifax, j’ai pu constater de visu la profonde admiration que lui portaient divers groupes de personnes. Que ce respect vienne des militaires, qui constituaient une grande partie de sa base électorale, ou des gens de la communauté pacifiste locale, elle est devenue leur amie, un mentor pour beaucoup et en effet était presque vénérée. Avec sa passion pour les questions de justice sociale, sa conviction que les privilèges impliquent des responsabilités, sa formation de travailleuse sociale et son énergie apparemment illimitée, elle a accompli beaucoup. Alexa, tu nous manques. »   

Sœur Mary-Ellen Francoeur de Religions pour la Paix souligne que « pendant une invitation pour parler de son expérience de la paix, elle a utilisé le temps pour discuter de sa position et de celle du NPD sur les armes nucléaires. Elle s’est exprimée avec beaucoup de force. Comme toujours, elle était aussi très gracieuse et chaleureuse. C’était un tel cadeau que d’être en présence d’une politicienne à la tête d’un parti si engagée envers l’abolition des armes nucléaires. »

Andy Knight, Université de l’Alberta a déclaré, « quelle femme merveilleuse et l’une des rares politiciennes authentiques, tant au niveau provincial que fédéral. Alexa, à sa manière discrète, a laissé un héritage qui est formidable. »

Dr David Harries, ancien président du Groupe canadien Pugwash a souligné, « Alexa et moi ne nous connaissions pas bien. Mais, pour moi, elle était l’une des meilleures canadiennes que j’ai rencontrées. Lors de la seule conversation en tête-à-tête que nous avons eue – à Thinkers Lodge, je crois – elle m’a surpris en connaissant mes antécédents militaires et en disant (sans aucune provocation de ma part) qu’il était “très important” que les militaires soient pleinement engagés dans le travail pour la paix. C’est la seule personne à m’avoir adressé ainsi. »

Bev Delong, ancienne présidente du Réseau canadien pour l’abolition des armes nucléaires, a formulé qu’« Alexa nous a fait sentir que nous étions les bienvenus à la cité parlementaire, que nous avions le droit, et même le devoir, de nous engager avec les parlementaires dans notre travail pour l’abolition nucléaire. Ce fut un privilège de recevoir son invitation à informer l’Équipe de la paix. Et lors de nos réunions du Réseau, nous avons apprécié la compréhension intelligente qu’Alexa avait du monde de la politique. »  

Peggy Mason, Présidente de l’Institut Rideau a souligné, « il y a beaucoup à examiner alors que nous nous souvenons de sa contribution hors du commun à la vie publique canadienne et à la place des femmes dans celle-ci. Mais en fin de compte, c’est sa chaleur, sa gentillesse, son énergie, son esprit infaillible et son humour dont je me souviens le plus. »

Le Réseau adresse ses sincères remerciements à Alexa et espère que son héritage en matière de paix, de désarmement et d’abolition des armes nucléaires sera honorablement repris par d’autres parlementaires canadiens courageux.

January 22: TPNW anniversary

Today, Saturday January 22, marks the first anniversary of the historic moment of the entry into force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW).

Over the last year, CNANW has requested that the government of Canada attend the First Meeting of the States Parties (FMSP) as observer. 

On this anniversary, CNANW acknowledges the efforts of organizations and individuals in working together to create a new platform for global dialogue towards the ultimate goal of the abolition of nuclear weapons. May it be successful!

Jordan Bishop

Ottawa peace activist Jordan Bishop

Jordan, who passed away in late October, was the Veterans Against Nuclear Arms representative to CNANW, while VANA was active. He was a long time peace advocate, well-known and a friend of many, particularly in the Ottawa area. “He was a lifelong advocate for peace, actively opposing military intervention from Vietnam to Iraq and Afghanistan, and working to end nuclear arms – in the peace and anti-nuclear movements in Cape Breton, and in Project Ploughshares and Veterans Against Nuclear Arms.”

As Ernie Regehr writes: “It was always a pleasure to have extended conversations with him – he obviously read very widely, had great knowledge of history, and was an innovative thinker. One always ended a chat with him better informed, and feeling the better for having spent time with him.”

Obituary in the Ottawa Citizen

CNANW Letter to Prime Minister Trudeau: Canada can join Norway and attend first TPNW meeting

[Aussi, en français: https://www.cnanw.ca/category/documents-en-francais/]

Rt. Hon. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
Minister of Foreign Affairs Mélanie Joly
Minister of Defence Anita Anand

October 28, 2021

Canada can join Norway and attend first TPNW meeting

Dear Mr. Prime Minister, Madame Foreign Minister and Madame Defence Minister,

This month the Government of Norway announced that it will attend the first Meeting of States Parties to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (1MSP-TPNW) in Vienna (22-24 March 2022) as an Observer. This is welcome news and an indication that, within NATO, States in support of the abolition of nuclear weapons can work together towards that goal whether or not they are signatories to the TPNW. This commitment to dialogue is a particularly important signal to Canada’s new government in the lead up to the Tenth Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) in January 2022.

A recent Nanos poll indicates that 80% of Canadians support nuclear weapons elimination; 74% believe Canada should join the new Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, even if there is pressure from the United States to stay clear. 

The Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW) encourages Canada to also commit, as Norway has done, to attending the TPNW States parties meeting as an Observer. Our government can make an early and clear statement to this effect and encourage other NATO members to also attend. CNANW supports Canada acceding to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons or to a new comprehensive Nuclear Weapons Convention that will achieve the same stated goal: the total elimination of nuclear weapons.

Canada is able to sign and ratify the TPNW while a member of NATO as long as our government disassociates Canada from NATO’s existing nuclear deterrence doctrine. As recommended unanimously by the House of Commons Standing Committee on National Defence in its 2018 report, Canada can take “a leadership role within NATO in beginning the work necessary for achieving the NATO goal of “creating the conditions for a world free of nuclear weapons.”

As members of the Stockholm Initiative, Canada and Norway are also well placed to work together within NATO to develop a cohort of alliance members engaged in challenging nuclear deterrence policy, during the alliance’s current review of its “Strategic Concept” slated to be adopted at the next NATO Summit in June 2022.

The new government in Canada has a fresh opportunity to work with like-minded States and middle powers, such as Norway and others, and to revitalize our traditional disarmament credentials. The nuclear weapons threat demands measurable progress on nuclear non-proliferation and arms control, and towards the elimination of nuclear weapons. CNANW expects to see early concrete action in this direction from our government, in keeping with the wishes of most Canadians, and we stand ready to assist in achieving this common objective.

Sincerely,

Robin Collins and Dr. Sylvie Lemieux, Co-Chairpersons
Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons
Le Réseau canadien pour l’abolition des armes nucléaires

and the following member organizations:
Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility – Gordon Edwards, President
Canadian Disarmament Information Service  – Metta Spencer, Chairperson
Canadian Peace Research Association – Erika Simpson, President
Canadian Pugwash Group – Cesar Jaramillo, Chair
Canadian Voice of Women for Peace – Nancy Covington and Lyn Adamson
Friends for Peacebuilding and Conflict Prevention – Richard Denton
The Group of 78 – Roy Culpeper, Chair
Hiroshima Nagasaki Day Coalition, Mary-Ellen Francoeur
International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War Canada – Jonathan Down, President
Project Ploughshares – Cesar Jaramillo, Executive Director
Religions for Peace Canada – Pascale Frémond, President
Rideau Institute – Peggy Mason, President
Science for Peace – Arnd Jurgensen
World Federalist Movement–Canada – Alexandre MacIsaac, Executive Director

Additional Signatories: organizations and individuals

Response to CNANW Letter by Office of The Prime Minister: here

RCAAN Lettre: TIAN – Le Canada peut se joindre à la Norvège et assister à la première réunion

28 octobre 2021
TIAN – Le Canada peut se joindre à la Norvège et assister à la première réunion

Cher Monsieur le Premier Ministre Trudeau, Madame la Ministre des Affaires étrangères et Madame la Ministre de la Défense,

Ce mois-ci, le gouvernement norvégien a annoncé qu’il participerait à la première réunion des États parties au Traité sur l’interdiction des armes nucléaires (1REP- TIAN) à Vienne (22-24 mars 2022) en tant qu’observateur. C’est une bonne nouvelle et une indication qu’au sein de l’OTAN, les États en faveur de l’abolition des armes nucléaires peuvent travailler ensemble vers cet objectif, qu’ils soient ou non signataires du TPNW. Cet engagement au dialogue est un signal particulièrement important pour le nouveau gouvernement du Canada dans la perspective de la dixième Conférence d’examen du Traité sur la non-prolifération des armes nucléaires (TNP) en janvier 2022.

Un récent sondage Nanos indique que 80 % des Canadiens appuient l’élimination des armes nucléaires; 74 % croient que le Canada devrait adhérer au nouveau Traité sur l’interdiction des armes nucléaires, même s’il y a des pressions de la part des États-Unis pour rester à l’écart.

Le Réseau canadien pour l’abolition des armes nucléaires (RCAAN) encourage le Canada à s’engager également, comme la Norvège l’a fait, à assister à la réunion des États parties au TIAN en tant qu’observateur. Notre gouvernement peut faire une déclaration rapide et claire à cet effet et encourager d’autres membres de l’OTAN à y participer également. Le RCAAN appuie l’adhésion du Canada au Traité sur l’interdiction des armes nucléaires ou à une nouvelle convention globale sur les armes nucléaires qui atteindra le même objectif déclaré : l’élimination totale des armes nucléaires.

Le Canada est en mesure de signer et de ratifier le TIAN alors qu’il est membre de l’OTAN, à condition que notre gouvernement dissocie le Canada de la doctrine de dissuasion nucléaire existante de l’OTAN. Comme l’a recommandé à l’unanimité le Comité permanent de la défense nationale de la Chambre des communes dans son rapport de 2018, le Canada peut assumer « un rôle de chef de file au sein de l’OTAN en commençant le travail nécessaire pour atteindre l’objectif de l’OTAN de « créer les conditions d’un monde exempt d’armes nucléaires ». »

En tant que membres de l’Initiative de Stockholm, le Canada et la Norvège sont également bien placés pour travailler ensemble au sein de l’OTAN afin de former une cohorte de membres de l’Alliance engagés dans la remise en cause de la politique de dissuasion nucléaire, lors de l’examen actuel par l’Alliance de son « concept stratégique » qui doit être adopté au prochain sommet de l’OTAN en juin 2022.

Le nouveau gouvernement du Canada a une nouvelle occasion de travailler avec des États et des puissances moyennes animés des mêmes idées, comme la Norvège et d’autres, et de revitaliser nos références traditionnelles en matière de désarmement. La menace des armes nucléaires exige des progrès mesurables en matière de non-prolifération et de contrôle des armements nucléaires vers l’élimination des armes nucléaires. Le RCAAN s’attend à ce que notre gouvernement prenne rapidement des mesures concrètes dans cette direction, conformément aux souhaits de la plupart des Canadien.ne.s, et nous sommes prêts à aider à atteindre cet objectif commun.

Nous vous prions d’accepter, l’expression de nos sentiments distingués,

Robin Collins et Dr. Sylvie Lemieux, coprésidents RCAAN

Ainsi que les organisations membres suivantes,
Regroupement pour la surveillance du nucléaire – Gordon Edwards, Président
Canadian Disarmament Information Service  – Metta Spencer, Président
Association Canadienne de Recherche Pour la Paix– Erika Simpson, Président
Les Conférences Pugwash Canada – Cesar Jaramillo, Président
Canadian Voice of Women for Peace – Nancy Covington and Lyn Adamson
Friends for Peacebuilding and Conflict Prevention – Richard Denton
Le Groupe des 78 – Roy Culpeper, Chair
The Group of 78 – Roy Culpeper, Chair
Hiroshima Nagasaki Day Coalition, Mary-Ellen Francoeur
International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War Canada – Jonathan Down, Président
Project Ploughshares – Cesar Jaramillo, Executive Director
Religions for Peace Canada – Pascale Frémond, Président
Institut Rideau – Peggy Mason, Président
Science for Peace – Arnd Jurgensen
Le Mouvement fédéraliste mondial – Canada – Alexandre MacIsaac, Executive Director

Signataires supplémentaires

CNANW 2021 ELECTION CALL

Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons
Dear Friends and Colleagues, 

The 2021 federal election is an opportunity to reinforce our Network’s call on leaders of political parties. 

Canadians care deeply about nuclear disarmament and want Canada to step up this country’s engagement on this critically important issue.

To this end, we invite organizations and individuals across Canada, to undertake the following:

1. In debates, or while meeting candidates at your front door, point out that:
80% of Canadians support nuclear weapon elimination. 74% believe Canada should join the new Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, even if there is pressure from the United States to stay clear. 

And ask them: Do you support Canada playing a stronger international leadership role on nuclear disarmament? What will you and your party do to support this effort? 

2. In correspondence, please remind candidates of these calls that CNANW has issued:

The Canadian government should act upon the motion adopted unanimously in the House of Commons and the Senate in 2010 which requested that the Government of Canada engage in negotiations for a nuclear weapons convention and deploy a major world-wide Canadian diplomatic initiative in support of “preventing nuclear proliferation and increasing the rate of nuclear disarmament.”    

The Government of Canada should:

1. Welcome the Entry Into Force of the historic Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW), accede to this Treaty at the earliest possible date and actively promote its universalization;

2. Participate as an observer at the inaugural meeting of the new TPNW, expected to be in early 2022.

3. Canada should participate at the ministerial level in the meeting of the Stockholm Initiative of 16 states, and in its emphasis on strengthening the Treaty on Non-Proliferation on Nuclear Weapons.

4. Allow a full Parliamentary debate on Canada’s role in advancing nuclear disarmament;

5. Conduct formal hearings in the House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development to enable Canadian citizens with extensive knowledge and expertise to advise on ways that Canada can more effectively facilitate nuclear disarmament;

6. Make clear that nuclear disarmament shall be among the highest priorities for Canada. Then, work closely with the UN Secretary General and his officials, like-minded nations and civil society to achieve the goal of the total elimination of nuclear weapons;

7. Disassociate Canada from NATO’s nuclear security doctrine and take a leadership role within NATO to begin the work necessary for achieving NATO’s own goal of “creating the conditions for a world free of nuclear weapons”, as recommended unanimously by the House of Commons Standing Committee on National Defense in 2018;  

8. Press all nuclear-armed states to 1) commit to a ‘no first use’ nuclear weapons policy and remove all nuclear weapons from ‘high-alert’ status, 2) cease the modernization and expansion of nuclear arsenals and decommission and destroy nuclear weapons within their possession or control as soon as possible; and 3) engage in dialogue for effective treaties and the creation of additional Nuclear Weapons-Free Zones; 4) promote a new security framework based upon the principle of sustainable common security.    

We invite all Canadians across the country to raise their concerns about the urgency of nuclear disarmament at every opportunity, and to engage all candidates throughout the election campaign in pursuit of a world without nuclear weapons. 


Sincerely,

Dr. Sylvie Lemieux and Robin Collins
Co-Chairs, CNANW

Why do we Still Have Nuclear Weapons?

by Robin Collins and Dr. Sylvie Lemieux, Co-chairpersons, CNANW

A recent Nanos poll found 80% across-the-board support for nuclear weapon elimination. A strong 74% majority believe Canada should join the new Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (“the ban treaty” or TPNW), even if there is pressure from the United States to stay clear. Those results are no surprise. Similar enthusiasm is found in older polls, and in Canadian municipalities where Councils have supported “nuclear-weapons-free zones” for many years

In an International Committee of the Red Cross 2019 global survey, millennials (those born between 1980 and 1994) in the 16 countries polled, overwhelmingly (82%) oppose the use of all weapons of mass destruction – be they nuclear, biological, or chemical – in any circumstance.

And yet, almost half “believe nuclear weapons are an effective instrument of deterrence.”

How can this be?

There lingers a belief that possessing a nuclear arsenal may protect you from enemies. There is also a lack of political leadership countering this dangerous illusion.

For example, just recently the United Kingdom announced they would increase their Trident submarine nuclear warhead limit. There are also plans to “modernize” the arsenals of most nuclear-armed states, including Russia, the USA and China. Some militaries see these weapons as war-fighting options, or as an appropriate response to an overwhelming conventional weapon attack.

And the Canadian government has snubbed the new ban treaty. Rob Oliphant, the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, said the ban is “inconsistent with Canada’s collective defence obligations” as a member of NATO. Within the Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, however, we point to NATO’s own policy in support of “eventual” nuclear weapons abolition. And Canada has options: Either sign the treaty while pushing back against alliance nuclear deterrence policy; or work harder for a nuclear weapons convention, as Canada did before. Get back in the game.

Canadian disarmament practice hasn’t always been so hesitant – over decades, leadership was shown on antipersonnel landmines, but also nuclear weapons policy. A resolution was supported by all members of the House of Commons and Senate as recently as 2010. It called on the government to “engage in negotiations for a nuclear weapons convention” and to “deploy a major world-wide Canadian diplomatic initiative” towards that end.  Despite the all-party mandate, the last ten years saw little initiative by Canada.

There is, however, a new effort — that includes Canada — known as the Stockholm Initiative. Sixteen states are engaged, including ban supporters New Zealand, Indonesia and Kazakhstan, but also NATO members Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, and Spain, as well as two non-NATO nuclear umbrella states (South Korea and Japan). Will this be a fresh start?

“The initiative is positive in principle, but it is too soon to tell whether it will have any meaningful impact,” says Cesar Jaramillo, Executive Director of CNANW member group Project Ploughshares. “Efforts to reframe, rename and relaunch a series of steps or stones or blocks are also not new.” Canada should participate, and at the ministerial level, if this is to be a serious contribution.

Canada can also at minimum sit in as observer to the inaugural meeting of States Parties (likely in January 2022) of the new TPNW to show solidarity with the goals of its 122+ supporting or signatory states. This is also being considered by Germany.

A new global campaign for No First Use (NFU) of nuclear weapons has been established and encouraged the US and Russian leaders Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin at their bilateral meeting in Geneva to engage in talks to reduce nuclear risks. US President Biden is on record as questioning “first use” of nuclear weapons for the US. At the NATO summit of leaders this month, Canada had a chance to promote NFU for the alliance as a game-changing safer policy, but also as an early step towards nuclear weapon elimination.

This opens up the urgently needed discussion of alternatives to nuclear deterrence, a shift to sustainable common security for all peoples, and protection of the global environment. Canada needs to be there.

Canadian Nuclear Weapon Abolitionists Call on U.K. to Reconsider Warhead Increase

The Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW) joins with other disarmament organizations critical of the nuclear weapons policy shift of the government of the United Kingdom.



CNANW Statement March 25, 2021

The Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW) joins with other disarmament organizations critical of the nuclear weapons policy shift of the government of the United Kingdom. The British defence and foreign policy review, “Global Britain in a Competitive Age”, would increase the number of nuclear weapons in the U.K. arsenal. It would also extend the declared purposes of nuclear deterrence to a wider range of perceived threats. Germany’s Foreign Minister Heiko Maas has cautioned that “there are already too many nuclear warheads in the world, not too few.” He added: “The past has shown that if one side has more nuclear weapons, the other side will try to catch up. And that is the disastrous arms race we have been in for decades.”

We urge the government of British Prime Minister Johnson to reverse these regressive and provocative steps as they are in violation of treaty obligations. They carry the inherent risk of re-fueling both a nuclear and conventional arms race.

Instead of reducing to a maximum of 180 nuclear warheads from the current 195, as previously promised, the new plan moves in the opposite direction by increasing the Trident-purposed arsenal to a new cap of 260 warheads. In contrast to limiting the scope of nuclear deterrence and moving towards full elimination as required by the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the UK’s declared policy is being extended to “emerging technologies” and to a wider range of weapons of mass destruction.

Three former Canadian U.N. Disarmament Ambassadors quickly reacted to the U.K. policy shift.

The Honourable Douglas Roche O.C. stated that:

On February 26, 2020, the United Kingdom joined a unanimous statement by the U.N. Security Council calling on all states parties to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty to cooperate in nuclear disarmament measures. What happened to suddenly move the U.K. government to increase its nuclear arsenal by 40 percent?  This appears to be the U.K. response to the entry into force of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. So much for the humanitarian movement against nuclear weapons! Power politics rears its ugly head once more. This unconscionable act, which drives ahead the nuclear arms race, jeopardizes the success of the NPT Review Conference later this year. Canada must join Germany in criticizing the U.K.’s reckless act.

Peggy Mason, who heads the Rideau Institute, further said that:

The new UK defence policy reduces transparency in that country’s operational stockpile and deployed warheads. It also expands the circumstances in which it would use, or threaten to use, nuclear weapons against a non-nuclear weapon state party to the NPT, beyond weapons of mass destruction, to include threats from unspecified “emerging technologies” of “comparable impact”.   It is hard to see these extraordinarily destabilizing actions as anything other than a desperately diminished post-Brexit Britain struggling to maintain some semblance of global prestige.

And Paul Meyer, who is also the Chair of the Canadian Pugwash Group, notes that:

At the last NPT Review Conference in 2015, the UK delivered a statement committing to limit operationally deployed warheads on its ballistic missile submarines to no more than 120 and to reduce its overall nuclear warhead stockpile to no more than 180 by the mid-2020s. The announced change in UK nuclear policy represents a betrayal of that pledge and sends the worst of all possible signals to the NPT community in the lead up to its August Review Conference. In 2015 the UK promised “to strive to build conditions for a world without nuclear weapons”. Doesn’t Prime Minister Johnson’s Government realize that increasing nuclear arsenals is not one of the ways to get to that goal?

CNANW joins many others in challenging the rationale of the UK’s decision. Whatever the political reasons for the redirection of official United Kingdom defence policy, CNANW sees the proposal as an affront to the entry into force of the two-month-old Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW), and as a challenge to this year’s planned Review Conference deliberations for the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT).

We call on the Canadian government to clearly state its disappointment to its NATO ally, to urge caution and press Prime Minister Johnson to reverse the implementation of a policy that would lead to a more dangerous world with a greater likelihood of proliferation of nuclear weapons.

In these days of pandemics and other global stresses, the world requires sober and thoughtful vision, with leadership that pulls us together for shared mutual security and risk reduction goals. We need to avoid — not increase — global risks from dangerous, and regressive policy changes.

Robin Collins and Dr. Sylvie Lemieux
CNANW Co-Chairpersons

cnanw@web.net  www.cnanw.ca

The Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW) was established in 1996 by representatives of national organizations that share the conviction that nuclear weapons are immoral and should be abolished.

Robin Collins and Dr. Sylvie Lemieux Succeed Earl Turcotte as Co-Chairs of the Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW).

Mr. Robin Collins, an active supporter of nuclear disarmament and global governance for more than 30 years, and Dr. Sylvie Lemieux, a retired Lieutenant-Colonel army engineer and public service executive, will jointly Co-Chair the Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, effective March 19, 2021.

Continue reading “Robin Collins and Dr. Sylvie Lemieux Succeed Earl Turcotte as Co-Chairs of the Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW).”

Statement by Hon. Douglas Roche, O.C. Press Conference on Treaty on Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons Ottawa, January 21, 2021

We are celebrating the entry into force tomorrow of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. Why is this treaty necessary?

          Let us cast our eyes back fifty years to another treaty entry into force, this time the Non-Proliferation Treaty.  The NPT was essentially a bargain: non–nuclear weapons states would forsake any attempt to acquire nuclear weapons in return for the nuclear weapons possessors to negotiate in good faith their elimination. 

Continue reading “Statement by Hon. Douglas Roche, O.C. Press Conference on Treaty on Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons Ottawa, January 21, 2021”

Lettre au premier ministre: “pour vous presser de faire de la désescalade de crise”

Monsieur le premier ministre, Le Réseau canadien pour l’abolition des armes nucléaires et le Rassemblement canadien pour une convention sur les armes nucléaires s’adressent à vous et à votre gouvernement, en cette crise nucléaire mondiale qui s’intensifie chaque jour, pour vous presser de faire de la désescalade de crise et d’une diplomatie persistante et intensifiée en matière de désarmement, une priorité nationale.

Lettre ici

Lettre: dangers des armes nucléaires

“Le Réseau canadien pour l’abolition des armes nucléaires et le Rassemblement canadien pour une convention sur les armes nucléaires s’adressent à vous et à votre gouvernement, en cette crise nucléaire mondiale qui s’intensifie chaque jour, pour vous presser de faire de la désescalade de crise et d’une diplomatie persistante et intensifiée en matière de désarmement, une priorité nationale.”

Final.Letter to Prime Minister.Eng.091118 (in English)

Final.Letter to Prime Minister.Fr.091118 (en français)

Statements


  • Restoring Canada’s Nuclear Disarmament Policies Expert Seminar, February 2008:
    • Event Report (english, pdf)
    • Statement (english, pdf)
    • Séminaire d’experts sur la restitution de leadership Canadiene sur le désarmement nucléaire
    • Déclaration (pdf)

    • Text Box: Vers 2010: Priorités en vue d’un consensus à propos du TNP
      • Rapport de l’Initiative des puissances moyennes, Avril 2007
        [MPI Statement to Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs]
      • Mémoire de l’Initiative des puissances moyennes en prévision de la réunion du Comité préparatoire du TNP qui aura lieu à Vienne, en 2007 [rtf; pdf]

    • Canadians Call for End to Nuclear Weapons in NATO/Des Canadiens exigent la suppression du recours à l’armement nucléaire par l’OTAN:






Signatories/Signataires Academic Statement

Signatories/Signataires Academic Statement

Signatories/Signataires (18 mai/May 18 2010):

Beverly Anderson
Associate Professor Emeritus (retired) 
Faculty of Nursing
University of Calgary

Dr. Mary-Wynne Ashford 
Assoc Prof (retired)
School of Child and Youth Care,
University of Victoria.

Hélène Beauchamp
Professeure émérite (retraitée)
École supérieure de théâtre
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Marie Beaulieu Ph.D. Directrice du département de danse Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur Paul Bélanger
Département d’éducation et formation spécialisées
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeure Colette Bellavance
Faculté de médecine et des sciences de la santé
Université de Sherbrooke

Professor Jordan Bishop (retired)
Department of Humanities
Cape Breton University

Professeure Colette Boky
Prix du Québec, O.C.
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Katherine Bonathan (retired)
Kwantlen Polytechnical University
Surrey, BC

Professeure Denise Brassard Département d’Études littéraires Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Carl Braun
Professor Emeritus
Department of Applied Psychology
University of Calgary

Claude Braun, Ph.D.
Professeur titulaire au département de psychologie
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur André Breton
Département des communications
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Merlin B. Brinkerhoff
Professor Emeritus
Department of Sociology
University of Calgary

Professeure Anne-Marie Broudehoux
École de design
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)  

Professor Michael Byers
Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law
University of British Columbia

Professor Max Cameron
Dept. of Political Science
University of British Columbia

Debbie Carroll, PhD, MTA Professeure de Musicothérapie Département de musique Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

André F. Charette, Ph.D. Professeur titulaire
Département d’organisation et ressources humaines École des sciences de la gestion (ESG-UQAM)
Université du Québec à Montréal                                                                                                                                              

Dr. Normand Chevrier
Département de biologie
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Arthur Clark
Professor of Neuropathology
Faculty of Medicine
University of Calgary

Professeur Alessandro Colizzi
École de Design
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Phyllis Creighton
Adjunct faculty
Faculty of Divinity
Trinity College, Toronto

Louis Cyr
Professeur retraité
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Edwin E. Daniel
Professor Emeritus, Adjunct Professor
Dept. of Pharmacology
University of Alberta

Professor Dayna B. Daniels
Coordinator, Women’s Studies
University of Lethbridge

Professeure Martine Delvaux Études littéraires
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Emily Doolittle Assistant Professor of Music Composition Cornish College of the Arts – Seattle

Professeur Gilles Dostaler
Département des sciences économiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur François Dragon
Département des sciences biologiques
Université du Québec à Montréal

Professeur Michel Duguay
Ph.D. en physique nucléaire (Yale University)
Département de génie électrique et de génie informatique
Université Laval

Professeure adjointe Carolina Ferrer
Département d’études littéraires
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Trevor Findlay
William and Jeanie Barton Chair in International Affairs
Director, Canadian Centre for Treaty Compliance
Professor, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs
Carleton University

Professeur Hervé Fischer
Fondateur de l’Observatoire international du numérique de Montréal
Chercheur Hexagram
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Jean Fisette Professeur associé Département d’études littéraires
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Ward Flemons
Faculty of Medicine
University of Calgary

Martin Foster
Professeur associé (retraité)
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal

Professeur Jean-Louis Gagnon
Directeur du programme de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Louis Gill
Professeur retraité
Département des sciences économiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeure Jacinthe Giroux Département d’éducation et formation spécialisées Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Trudy Govier 
Department of Philosophy
University of Lethbridge

Professor Donald Grayston
Department of Humanities
Simon Fraser University

Professor Richard Guy
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Calgary

Professeure Nicole Harbonnier-Topin
Département de danse
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Stoody Harding (ret.)
Past Director of School of Human Justice
University of Regina

Professor  Maureen S. G. Hawkins
Department of English
University of Lethbridge

Professor Yvonne Hébert
Faculty of Education
University of Calgary

Professeur Mario Houde
Département des sciences biologiques
Université du Québec à Montréal

Connie Isenberg, Ph.D., MTA, MT-BC,
FAMI Psychologue et psychanalyste Professeur Musicothérapie Département de musique Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur titulaire Pierre Jasmin
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeure Catherine Jumarie, Ph.D
Département des sciences biologiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor  Catherine Kingfisher
Department of Anthropology
University of Lethbridge

Professor John Kirk
Department of Spanish and Latin American Studies
Cape Breton University

Professeure Julie Lafond
Département des Sciences Biologiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur invité Gérald Larose
École de travail social
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)
 
Professeur Pierre Lebuis Département d’éducation et pédagogie Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur émérite Georges Leroux
Département de philosophie
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur Jacques Lévesque
Ancien doyen de la faculté de droit et de science politique
Département de sciences politiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Ernest McCullough (retired)
Faculty of of Arts & Science
St Thomas More College,
University of Saskatchewan

Dr. Peter Meincke
President Emeritus
University of Prince Edward Island

Ray Morris
Professor Emeritus of Sociology
York University

Emeritus Professor Ronald Neufeldt
Department of Religious Studies
University of Calgary

Professeure Michèle Nevert
Département d’études littéraires
Présidente du syndicat des professeures et professeurs de l’UQAM
Université du Québec à Montréal

Professor Jacquetta Newman
Chair, Department of Political Science
King’s University College, UWO
 
Dr. Peter Nicholls,
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Essex,
Colchester, Essex

Professor Mark Nitz
Department Chemistry
University of Toronto

Jean-Pierre Noiseux
Professeur associé
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Emerita Liisa L. North,
Department of Political Science 
York University

Dr Éric Notebaert
Faculté de médecine
Université de Montréal

Prof. James V Penna (ret.)
Faculty of Arts and Science
St. Thomas More College, 
University of Saskatchewan

Professeur émérite Jean-Marc Piotte
Département de science politique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Sergei Plekhanov 
Department of Political Science
York University

Professeure Louise Poissant
Doyenne de la Faculté des Arts
Chercheure à Hexagram
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur Laurent Poliquin Département des Sciences biologiques Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Richard Price
Director, Graduate Program
Department of Political Science
University of British Columbia

Professeure Dominique Primeau
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor Emeritus James Ramsay
Department of Psychology
McGill University

Eric Rassart, Ph.D. Département des sciences biologiques Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Ernie Regehr O.C.
Adjunct Associate Professor
Peace and Conflict Studies
Conrad Grebel University College
University of Waterloo.

Professor Dorothy Goldin Rosenberg 
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto

Professeur Max Roy
Université du Québec à Montréal
Président de la Fédération québécoise des professeures
et professeurs d’université (FQPPU)

Joanna Santa Barbara
Assoc. Prof. (retired), 
Psychiatry and Peace Studies
McMaster University

Professeure Lucie Sauvé Titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en éducation relative à l’environnement Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeure Claire Savoie
École des arts visuels et médiatiques
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professor J. Robert Sevick, M.D.
Head, Department of Radiology
Faculty of Medicine
University of Calgary

Professor Elemir Simko
Department of Veterinary Pathology
Western College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Saskatchewan

Dr. Jennifer Simons
Adjunct Professor
School for International Studies
Simon Fraser University

Professor Erika Simpson
Department of Political Science
University of Western Ontario

Professor Emeritus Graham M. Simpson
Department of Plant Sciences
University of Saskatchewan

Dr. Metta Spencer
Professor Emeritus of Sociology
University of Toronto

Professor Hank J. Stam
Department of Psychology
University of Calgary

Professeur Jacques Saint-Pierre Chaire SITQ d’immobilier École des sciences de la gestion Université du Québec à Montréal

Professeure Madeleine Saint-Pierre
retraitée
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. David Swann, M.L.A., 
Leader of the Official Opposition (Alberta)
Former Professor of Public Health,
University of Calgary

Miklós Takács
Professeur associé (retraité)
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Jean-Guy Vaillancourt
Professeur associé au département de sociologie
Prix Michel-Jurdant 2009 de l’ACFAS pour les sciences environnementales
Université de Montréal

Louise Vandelac, Ph.D. Professeure titulaire au département de sociologie et Institut des sciences de l’environnement
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Professeur André Villeneuve
Département de musique
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Dr. Michael Wallace
Professor Emeritus
Department of Political Science
University of British Columbia

Professor Maureen G. Wilson
Faculty of Social Work
University of Calgary
Professor Ian Winchester
Emeritus Dean
University of Calgary

Professor Melanie A. Woodin
Department of Cell & Systems Biology
Faculty of Arts & Science 
University of Toronto

Professor Andrew Woolley
Dept of Chemistry
University of Toronto

Professor Deborah Zamble
Department of Chemistry
University of Toronto


Does your group want to endorse the statement?

Does your group want to endorse the statement for abolition of nuclear weapons?
Group Statement of Support for the Abolition of Nuclear Weapons

Groups endorsing the following statement are endorsing the goal of the Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons. We are grateful for your moral support.

We believe that the use and threat of use of nuclear weapons are abhorrent and morally wrong. We call on the Government of Canada to work urgently with other nations to conclude a convention which will set out a binding timetable for the abolition of all nuclear weapons in the world.

Name of Group:

Name of Contact Person:

Address:

Phone:

Fax:

Email Address:

Email your endorsement to cnanw@web.ca